Multimedia

Ecological Civilization and Tackling Climate Change
UN Climate Change Events
2024

From COP27. Participants share cases about how different environmental issues, such as ecosystem protection, sustainable energy, pollution prevention and control, could synergize with climate action. They systematically demonstrate internal relation between the core concept of Ecological Civilization and tackling climate change. Speakers mainly come from the Ministry of Ecology and Environment of China, international think tanks and relevant NGOs and enterprises which have rich experience and cases on different environmental issues.

Climate Change, Christianity, and the Capitalocene
Dr. Joerg Rieger
Vanderbilt University
2024
Christianity has contributed to climate change in various ways, but what are the connections between Christianity, climate change, and what has been called the “Capitalocene,” in contradistinction to notions of the “Anthropocene”? And what might these connections teach us about possible solutions to the problems of climate change? Dr Rieger will be discussing core issues from his  new book Theology in the Capitalocene: Ecology, Identity, Class, and Solidarity.
The Unexpected Way Spirituality Connects to Climate Change
Gopal D. Patel
TED Countdown Summit
2023

Environmental activist Gopal D. Patel thinks the climate movement could learn a lot from one of the longest-standing social initiatives in human history: religion. Exploring three areas where frameworks from faith traditions could benefit the climate movement, Patel offers a playbook for discovering your big idea to build momentum towards powerful social change.

Response to the Cry of the Earth
Daniel R. DiLeo, Carlos J. Martinez, Deacon Kent Ferris OFS
Catholic Climate Covenant
2023

Session #8 of the Laudato Si' and the U.S. Catholic Church focuses on the Laudato Si' Action Platform's goal of “Response to the Cry of the Earth” which “s a call to protect our common home for the wellbeing of all, as we equitably address the climate crisis, biodiversity loss, and ecological sustainability.” Panelists included: Daniel R. DiLeo, PhD, Associate Professor and Director of the Justice and Peace Studies Program at Creighton University; Carlos J. Martinez, PhD, Earth Scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research; Deacon Kent Ferris, OFS, Director of Social Action and Catholic Charities in the Diocese of Davenport, IA.

The Climate Challenge Breakout Session
Sadhvi Bhagawati Saraswati, Katherine Marshall, Rev. Fletcher Harper, Maja Groff, Rev. Dr. Samuel Richmond Saxena, Gopal Patel, Pinaki Dasgupta
G20 Interfaith
2023

The broad impact of changing climate and issues for intergenerational climate justice are central to all global agendas, from economic and financial policies to political and cultural relations. Religious actors have central roles, both in the formal spaces such as the COP meetings and in national and community policies. Translating this into effective advocacy and mobilization and modeling action link religious and interreligious communities to global and especially G20 agendas. This discussion will take stock of actions to date and look especially to the 2023 COP 28 meetings in Dubai. Both the Interfaith Rainforest Initiative and Faiths4Earth mobilize and integrate religious communities, working side by side towards global climate objectives. Moderator: Sadhvi Bhagawati Saraswati, Secretary General, Global Interfaith Wash Alliance, India; Panelists: Dr. Katherine Marshall, Vice President ,G20 Interfaith Forum; Rev. Fletcher Harper, Executive Director, GreenFaith; Maja Groff, Convener of Climate Governance Commission; Rev. Dr. Samuel Richmond Saxena, Dean, Faculty of Interfaith and Religious Studies and Director, Centre for Advanced Religious Studies, North East Christian University, Nagaland; Gopal Patel, Co-Founder & Director, Bhumi Global; Pinaki Dasgupta, Member –Working Group on Pollution, Faith for Earth Initiative, Sr. Consultant, The Associated Chambers of Commerce and Industry of India.

“Youth Voices on Climate From Religious and Spiritual Perspectives”
Madeline Canfield, Aashna Patel, Alethea Phillips, Aly Tharp
Temple of Understanding
2023

The Temple of Understanding ECO JUSTICE FOR ALL Dialogues present “Youth Voices on Climate From Religious and Spiritual Perspectives.” Madeline Canfield, Jewish Youth Climate Movement/ Adamah; Aashna Patel, Hindu Climate Action UK; Alethea Phillips, Earth Guardians, Native Youth Alliance; Aly Tharp, GreenFaith USA. This event took place 06/28/2023. 

Faith Leaders Panel on Earth Care and Climate Change
Minnesota Interfaith Power and Light (MNIPL)
2023

A multi-faith panel of leaders introduce us to the jewels of their tradition’s teachings on care for the earth. Panelists include: - Dr. Prasad Bastodkar, Hindu Society of Minnesota; Payton Hoegh, Episcopal Los Angeles and Center for Spirituality in Nature; Rabbi Ricky Kamil Temple Israel, Minneapolis and Beacon Interfaith Housing Collaborative; Rev. Onryu Laura Kennedy, Buddhist priest/teacher.

Indigenous Knowing and Climate Futures Panel | Congress 2023
Candis Callison, Deborah McGregor, Naomi Klein
York University
2023

As part of the open programming at Congress 2023, the Faculty of Environmental & Urban Change (EUC) hosted a keynote panel titled “Indigenous Knowing and Climate Futures.” Candis Callison and Deborah McGregor, two distinguished Indigenous researchers and communicators, spoke about how Indigenous knowledges can make the threat of climate change and strategies of confronting it matter to broader publics. Award-winning author and activist Naomi Klein provided a response.  Candis Callison is the Canada Research Chair in Indigenous journalism, media, and public discourse and an Associate Professor at the University of British Columbia, jointly appointed in the School of Journalism, Writing, and Media and the Institute for Critical Indigenous Studies. Deborah B. McGregor is an associate professor and the Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Environmental Justice at Osgoode Hall Law School, cross-appointed with the Faculty of Environmental & Urban Change at York University. Naomi Klein is Co-Director of the Centre for Climate Justice, and Associate Professor of Climate Justice at the University of British Columbia. This event took place on 5/31/2023.

JPAC Capitol Summit 2023 | PANEL: The Jewish Case for Climate Action
Ben Allen, Rebecca Joy Fletcher, Julie Saxe-Taller, Joel Simonds
Jewish Public Affairs Committee of California
2023

Featuring Senator Ben Allen, Coastal Roots Farm’s Director of Jewish Life Cantor Rebecca Joy Fletcher, and CA Religious Action Center’s Lead Organizer Rabbi Julie Saxe-Taller. Moderated by Jewish Center for Justice’s Founding Executive Director Rabbi Joel Simonds. Panel Convened at JPAC Capitol Summit 2023 which took place May 09, 2023 to May 10, 2023.

Spirit-led: An Interfaith Call to Climate Justice
For the Love of Creation
2023
This online gathering, hosted by EnviroMuslims, the Reform Jewish Community of Canada (RJCC) and For the Love of Creation (FLC), offered sharing in a circle of ritual and reflection on how our faith compels us to seek climate justice. The gathering was guided by Muslim, Jewish, Indigenous and Christian spiritual leaders, followed by discussion in breakout groups.
Buddhism and the Climate Crisis
Chris Ives
Barre Center for Buddhist Studies
2023
In this 30-minute video Chris Ives talks about “Buddhism and the Climate Crisis,” his upcoming book on the issue, and the upcoming workshop at BCBS. This event was streamed on April 7, 2023. 
Climate Change, Faith, and Organizing
Bill McKibben
Yale Divinity School
2023

A public conversation with environmentalist, writer, and activist Bill McKibben. McKibben is interviewed by YDS student Tyler Mark Nelson '24 M.Div., followed by questions from those gathered.

Spotlights ~ 3.15, Women for Climate Justice
Mallory McDuff
Yale Forum on Religion and Ecology
2023

This episode of Spotlights features Mallory McDuff. She is an author, educator, and mother, teaching environmental education at Warren Wilson College outside Asheville, North Carolina. Her writing stems from ordinary life–raising children and teaching students–amidst the enormity of our uncertain times, especially our changing climate. She talks about her new book, Love Your Mother: 50 States, 50 Stories, and 50 Women United for Climate Justice (Broadleaf Books, 2023). The book tells stories about women of diverse ages, backgrounds, and vocations–one from each of the fifty US states–as inspiration for a new kind of leadership focused on the heart of the climate crisis. More information about the book is available on the publisher's website: https://www.broadleafbooks.com/store/… More information about the author can be found on her website: https://www.warren-wilson.edu/people/…
Posted 3/13/2023

A Christian perspective on climate change
Katherine Hayhoe
Lanier Theological Library
2023
Dr. Katherine Hayhoe discusses a Christian perspective on climate change. Mounting scientific evidence clearly documents the risks posed by climate change to the poor, the needy, and other vulnerable populations, the very people Christians are called to love. She asserts that the planet is God's good creation and therefore it is a Christians responsibility to care for this gift from God.
Communication, Christianity, and Climate Change
Emma Bloomsfield
Gonzaga Center for Climate, Society, and the Environment
2023
Despite the scientifically established threats of climate change, there remains a segment of the U.S. population that is skeptical of the scientific consensus on climate change. Many scholars view the Christian community and its ties to conservative ideologies, as an obstacle to environmental action. Rather than thinking of Christians or climate skeptics as single unified groups, it is essential to recognize variations in interpretations that foster different environmental conclusions. By analyzing the complexity Christian environmentalism, we can better tailor our communication strategies to engage in ethical and productive ways. About the speaker: Emma Frances Bloomfield (PhD, University of Southern California) is an Associate Professor of Communication Studies at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. She is a rhetorician who studies environmental communication and scientific controversies. Her book, Communication Strategies for Climate Skepticism: Religion and the Environment (2019) was published in Routledge’s Advances in Climate Change Research series.
Spotlights ~ 3.12, Psychedelics and Climate Activism
Amber X Chen
Yale Forum on Religion and Ecology
2023

This episode of Spotlights features Amber X. Chen, a freelance journalist from Southern California whose work focuses on environmental justice. She contributed to several publications, including the climate and culture magainze Atmos, where she recently wrote a piece about the relationship between psychedelics, climate change, and environmental justice, “Tripping for the Planet: Psychedelics and Climate Change.” She discusses the problems and promises that psychedelics hold for the climate action toolkit, noting the particular importance of prioritizing the Indigenous communities for whom sacred plant medicines are part of their culture. You can read the full story here: https://atmos.earth/psychedelics-plan
Posted 1/30/2023

Jewish Community Farming and the Climate Crisis
Adrienne Krone
Anne Tanenbaum Centre for Jewish Studies
2023
In this David Lipson Memorial Lecture, Adrienne Krone discussed the contemporary Jewish Community Farming movement, which began with the founding of Adamah in 2004 and now consists of about twenty innovative and pluralistic organizations spread throughout the United States and Canada. Organizations like Shoresh Jewish Environmental Programs in Toronto use their land, resources, and networks to mitigate climate change through diverse methods, including ecological restoration and reforestation, pollinator repopulation, seed development, and political advocacy. Adrienne Krone is an Assistant Professor of Environmental Science and Sustainability and Religious Studies at Allegheny College. She has a Ph.D. in American Religion from Duke University and her research focuses on religious food justice movements in North America. Her current research project is an ethnographic and historical study of the Jewish community farming movement. This event took place on January 23, 2023.
Love in Action: Engaged Buddhism and the Climate Emergency
Joe Mishan
The Buddhist Centre
2022

How can we bring our faith tradition into the world at this time of climate, ecological and social crises? What does Buddhism have to offer the world at this time? Can engagement be part of the spiritual path? In this talk we acknowledge the deep roots of engaged Buddhism, and what an appropriate response might look like at this unique time in our planetary trajectory. Examples of engaged Buddhism will be drawn from Extinction Rebellion Buddhists. Given at the Triratna Earth Sangha Conference 2022 - Fear, Grief, and Faith: A Buddhist Approach to the Climate and Ecological Crises.

Spotlights ~ Ep. 3.3 Solar Energy, and the Inflation Reduction Act
Andreas Karelas
Yale Forum on Religion and Ecology
2022

This episode of Spotlights features Andreas Karelas, the founder and executive director of RE-volv, a nonprofit organization that empowers people around the country to help nonprofits in their communities go solar and raise awareness about the benefits of clean energy. He is also the author of Climate Courage: How Tackling Climate Change Can Build Community, Transform the Economy, and Bridge the Political Divide in America. Andreas talks about new developments in renewable energy, particularly in light of the Inflation Reduction Act in the USA. Signed into law in August 2022, the IRA includes almost $400 billion in spending on energy and climate change. Along with the IRA, Andreas discusses some new projects he is working on, including a partnership with Green The Church and Interfaith Power & Light, aimed at accelerating the deployment of solar energy in underserved communities by assisting BIPOC houses of worship around the country go solar. You can learn more about Re-volv here: https://re-volv.org/ More information about Climate Courage is available here: https://climatecourage.us Go here for more information about the Solar for BIPOC initiative: https://re-volv.org/solar-for-bipoc
Posted 9/26/2022

Facts, Faith, and our Future: A Christian Response to Climate Change
Katherine Hayhoe
BioLogos
2022
Katharine Hayhoe speaks at FAITH & SCIENCE, a BioLogos conference.
“Climate Change as Spiritual Practice” Part 2
Joanna Macy, Jonathan Gustin, David Schenck, Larry Churchill
Purpose Guides Institute
2022
Indigenous peoples, climate change and the role of decent work for a just and peaceful transition
Manuela Tomei, Oscar Pérez Ramirez, Lucy Mulenkei, Ivan Zambrana-Flores, Joan Carling
2022 Stockholm Forum on Peace and Development
2022

The session ‘Indigenous peoples, climate change and the role of decent work for a just and peaceful transition’ was organized in partnership with Indigenous Peoples Major Group for Sustainable Development, International Labour Organization and Right Energy Partnership with Indigenous Peoples at the 2022 Stockholm Forum on Peace and Development (#SthlmForum) held on the theme ‘From a Human Security Crisis Towards an Environment of Peace.' This session focuses on the interlinkages between indigenous peoples’ rights, climate action, the world of work, human security, and peace. It provides insights from the perspectives of indigenous peoples and government officials. The discussion aims to identify actions for increasing policy coherence and building innovative partnerships that (a) address the risks faced by indigenous peoples from the impacts of climate change; and (b) seek contributions from indigenous women and men to advance climate mitigation and adaptation efforts. 
Moderator: Manuela Tomei, Director, Conditions of Work and Equality Department, ILO;  Speakers: 
Oscar Pérez Ramirez, Vice Minister of Sustainable Development, Ministry of Energy and Mining, Guatemala; Lucy Mulenkei, Vice president, International Indigenous Women’s Forum; Ivan Zambrana-Flores, Minister Counsellor, Permanent Mission of Bolivia to the United Nations in New York; Joan Carling, Executive Director of the Right Energy Partnership with Indigenous Peoples. This event took place on 06/23/2022.

“Climate Change as Spiritual Practice” Part 1
Joanna Macy, Jonathan Gustin, David Schenck, Larry Churchill
Purpose Guides Institute
2022

Do you find it hard to meet the feelings that arise in you as you consider the state of our planet? Join us as we transform our anxiety into empowerment. Together, we can hold space for our grief and care, rekindling a sense of connection with nature and with our unique calling to serve the world.

“Grounded: Connections to Climate”
Passionist Earth & Spirit Center
2022

The Passionist Earth & Spirit Center has partnered with Bernheim Arboretum and Research Forest in Louisville, KY to capture stories surrounding our connection to nature in the midst of the climate crisis. Why should we care about climate change and where can we find hope? Through reflecting upon such questions, we are drawn to a greater appreciation for the natural world as we consider what individual steps we might take to ensure future generations can live on a healthy planet for years to come.

Climate Change Conversation
Bill McKibben, Mary Evelyn Tucker
Harvard University
2022

Environmentalist, academic, and author Bill McKibben engaged with Mary Evelyn Tucker, co-founder of the Yale Forum on Religion and Ecology on the topic of the “Climate Emergency”. This conversation took place at Sanders Theater in Cambridge, MA during the 50th reunion of the Harvard/Radcliffe class of 1971. This was the first of three reunion programs on the topic of climate change, the area of concern that 81% of the class members said was a “very big problem”. All told, twelve HR ‘ 71 classmates presented work their organizations are doing to address climate change. The objective of these presentations was to make known the actions classmates have undertaken so that significant, future HR ’71 collaborations might develop. This event took place on June 6, 2022. 

“Climate, Faith, and Justice”
Gerald L. Durley, Rosalyn LaPier, Kilaparti Ramakrishna, Mary Evelyn Tucker
Council on Foreign Relations
2022

Part of the 2022 Religion and Foreign Policy Workshop. The Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) is an independent, nonpartisan membership organization, think tank, and publisher. Visit the CFR website: http://www.cfr.org

“Climate, Faith, and Justice”
Gerald L. Durley, Rosalyn LaPier, Kilaparti Ramakrishna, Mary Evelyn Tucker
Council on Foreign Relations
2022

This panel was held at the 2022 Religion and Foreign Policy Workshop. The 2022 Religion and Foreign Policy Workshop was part of the CFR Religion and Foreign Policy program. The goal of the workshop is to advance understanding of the forces shaping international relations and provide members of the religion community with a forum to discuss issues with colleagues and experts in order to better inform their networks. Held on an annual basis since 2007, this event brings together clergy, seminary heads, scholars of religion, and representatives of faith-based organizations from across the country for discussions on global concerns with policymakers, CFR fellows, and other experts. Speakers: Gerald L. Durley, Rosalyn LaPier, Kilaparti Ramakrishna. Presider: Mary Evelyn Tucker
(Follow the link to view the video)

Why Indigenous Forest Guardianship is Crucial to Climate Action
Nonette Royo
TED Talks
2022

Indigenous communities have looked after their ancestral forests for millennia, cultivating immense amounts of knowledge on how to protect, nourish and heal these vital environments. Today, 470 million Indigenous people care for and manage 80 percent of the world's biodiversity – yet their legal rights to these lands are inexplicit and subject to exploitation by illegal loggers, miners and companies. Human rights lawyer Nonette Royo describes how her team at the Tenure Facility, an organization that provides legal assistance to Indigenous people by taking their land rights battles to court, will help these communities secure and defend 50 million hectares of forests over the next five years. Watch more: https://go.ted.com/nonetteroyo. This talk was recorded on April 2022. 

Faith & Hope as the Climate Changes
Katharine Hayhoe
Mormon Women for Ethical Government
2022

Katharine Hayhoe, chief scientist for The Nature Conservancy, and professor at Texas Tech University,  shares her expertise and thoughts about “Faith and Hope as the Climate Changes.” This event was hosted in collaboration with Mormon Environmental Stewardship Alliance, LDS Earth Stewardship, and the LDS Action Team of Citizens' Climate Lobby.

Climate Justice and the Jewish Community: A Call to Action Through Dialogue
Rabbi Ellen Bernstein, Rabbi Isaiah Rothstein, Kristy Drutman, Sophia Rich, Vicki Kaplan, Ariel Mayse
University of Michigan, School of Social Work
2022

This talk is entitled: Climate Justice and the Jewish Community: A Call to Action Through Dialogue, a facilitated panel discussion with a Q and A session where the speakers discuss the current action and movement within the Jewish community towards an environmentally-just future. The event features several panelists who offer various perspectives on what the next steps can be.

Speakers include Rabbi Ellen Bernstein, a pioneer in the field of religion and ecology and a eco-theologian, spiritual leader, writer and creative; Rabbi Isaiah Rothstein, a Black Jewish Rabbinic Scholar and Public Affairs Advisor at Jewish Federations of North America and leader of the JEDI (Jewish Equity, Diversity and Inclusion) and racial justice initiatives; Kristy Drutman, a Jewish-Filipina environmental media creator and founder of Brown Girl Green, a media platform exploring the intersections between media, diversity, and environmentalism; Sophia Rich, an Ann Arbor high school junior who is passionate about connecting Jewish principles and climate justice and a member of the National Leadership Board for the Jewish Youth Climate Movement; Vicki Kaplan, Director of Organizing at Dayenu: A Jewish Call to Climate Action, as well as an activist and campaigner committed to movement-building and anti-racism work; and Ariel Mayse, assistant professor in the Department of Religious Studies at Stanford University and researcher on resources of Jewish thought and theology for constructing contemporary environmental ethics. This conversation was streamed live on 03/27/2022.

Judaism and Climate Change: Environmental Ethics and Social Activism
Hava Tirosh-Samuelson
Emory University
2022

Prof. Hava Tirosh-Samuelson, Regents Professor, Irving and Miriam Lowe Professor of Modern Judaism, Professor of History, and the Director of Jewish Studies at Arizona State University in Tempe, AZ. This talk was delivered on March 21, 2022. 

The Use of Indigenous Traditional Knowledge in Climate Change Strategies
Lauren Risi, Cat Brigham, Sineia do Vale, Dalee Sambo Dorough
Woodrow Wilson Center
2021

The risks posed by climate change, and in particular climate’s impact on marginalized communities, have further exposed the linkages between climate change, environmental degradation, racism, and social injustice. Often missing from conversations focused on these injustices, however, is an awareness of the agency and knowledge that Indigenous communities bring to climate response. As the global community ramps up efforts to address climate change, incorporating Indigenous knowledge into those efforts could serve to inform scientific best practices for climate resilience and boost multi-stakeholder engagement at local, regional, and national levels. How can Indigenous knowledge help shape efforts to address climate change? What kinds of partnerships can ensure that Indigenous knowledge is incorporated into decision-making at various levels (i.e., from the local to national and international)? Join us for a discussion with leaders who are working to incorporate Indigenous knowledge into climate decision-making.
Moderator: Lauren Risi, Program Director of the Environmental Change and Security Program at the Wilson Center. Panelists: Cat Brigham, Chair of the Board of Trustees for the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation in northeast Oregon; Sineia do Vale, Coordinator of the Environmental Division of the Indigenous Council of Roraima and a member of the Climate Change Committee of the Coalition of Indigenous Peoples in Brazil; Dalee Sambo Dorough, International Chair of the Inuit Curcumpolar Council.
This event was recorded on November 3, 2021.

Sheikh Hamza Yusuf on Climate Change
Sheikh Hamza Yusuf
unEarth Muslims
2021

This talk premiered on Nov 2, 2021.

Healing our Trauma *is* Climate Action
Sr. Lăng Nghiêm, Br. Pháp Linh
Plum Village Monastery
2021
In this special livestreamed sharing upon their return from the TED Countdown Climate Conference, Sr. Lăng Nghiêm and Br. Pháp Linh continue the work of our teacher Thay and offer us a clear path to address the deep roots of our current ecological crisis. They explain how, together, through the way we train our understanding and live our daily lives, we can bring about the collective awakening that is needed to meet and transform the situation.
A Jewish Approach to Climate Change
Rabbi Yonatan Neril
Uri L’Tzedek
2021

Join Uri L'Tzedek and Rabbi Yonatan Neril for a Zoom webinar. A few weeks before the UN Climate Conference in Glasgow, Rabbi Yonatan Neril explores Jewish teachings that relate to climate change and why it’s so critical that Jewish communities mobilize to address the climate crisis. This webinar took place on Oct 8, 2021. 

Spotlights Clips ~ Ep. 52, Environmental Activism and Academia
Dr. Todd LeVasseur
Yale Forum on Religion and Ecology
2021

This week’s episode of Spotlights is a clip from our full episode with Dr. Todd LeVasseur, visiting assistant professor in the School of Humanities and Social Sciences at the College of Charleston in South Carolina. We discuss the importance of integrating activism into academia in order to facilitate viable responses to the climate emergency. We reflect on this issue for academia in general and for the academic field and activist force of religion and ecology in particular.. You can learn more about his work here: https://toddlevasseur.wordpress.com You can watch the full episode here: https://youtu.be/LAn0KBt2mH4.
Posted 09/13/2021.

Spotlights Clips ~ Ep. 51, Academia and Climate Change
Todd LeVasseur
Yale Forum on Religion and Ecology
2021

This week’s episode of Spotlights is a clip from our full episode with Dr. Todd LeVasseur, visiting assistant professor in the School of Humanities and Social Sciences at the College of Charleston in South Carolina. Reflecting on his new book, Climate Change, Religion, and our Bodily Future, he discusses the profound importance of religious studies and academia getting climate change right. You can learn more about his work here:  You can watch the full episode here. Posted 09/06/2021.

Climate Justice & Inequality: Decolonizing Climate Justice
Khelsilem
Below the Radar Podcast, Simon Fraser University
2021

Squamish Nation Councillor and community leader Khelsilem joins Am Johal on this first episode of Below the Radar’s Climate Justice & Inequality series. In this episode, they discuss the climate crisis as a result of the colonial project, how climate change hits hardest for those already at a disadvantage, and the spaces where colonialism has existed within climate movements. Khelsilem speaks to his critique of fossil fuel infrastructure, the false narrative of individual responsibility, and the role governments play in worsening the crisis through policy decisions that favour oil and gas. We also hear about innovative affordable housing projects, such as Squamish Nation’s Sen̓áḵw Development, and how to build climate-friendly design into new housing models. This podcast was released August 31, 2021. Follow link and scroll down the page to listen to podcast.

Spotlights ~ Ep. 50, Todd LeVasseur, PhD, College of Charleston
Todd LeVasseur
Yale Forum on Religion and Ecology
2021

This week’s episode of Spotlights features Dr. Todd LeVasseur, visiting assistant professor in the School of Humanities and Social Sciences at the College of Charleston in South Carolina, where he is also the director of the Sustainability Literacy Institute. We discuss his recently published book, Climate Change, Religion, and our Bodily Future (Rowman & Littlefield, 2021), including topics related to posthumanism, queer ecologies, ecological animisms, indigenous knowledges, material feminisms, deep adaptation, and more. We also discuss “A (Tough) Love Letter to Religious Studies,” which he wrote for Religion Dispatches in February 2021. You can learn more about his work here. You can learn more about the book at the publisher’s website. You can find his Religion Dispatches piece here. Posted 08/30/2021.

“Climate Crisis as a Spiritual Path”
Joanna Macy
Old Dog Documentaries
2021

This 20 minute interview with Joanna Macy will help answer an essential question: How are we going to live our lives fully, with inner peace and courage (and even joy) as we confront a world that is destroying itself?

Spotlights ~ Ep. 46, Religion and Climate Change
Andreas Karelas, David Haberman, Robin Globus Veldman
Yale Forum on Religion and Ecology
2021

This week's episode is a remix of previous interviews with guests who have written books that explore religious perspectives on climate change. First, we hear from Andreas Karelas, executive director of RE-volv — a nonprofit organization that empowers communities to invest in solar energy — and author of Climate Courage: How Tackling Climate Change Can Build Community, Transform the Economy, and Bridge the Political Divide in America (Beacon Press, 2020). The next guest is David Haberman, Professor in the Department of Religious Studies at Indiana University Bloomington, and author of Understanding Climate Change Through Religious Lifeworlds (Indiana University Press, 2021). Third, we hear from Robin Globus Veldman, Assistant Professor of Religious Studies at Texas A&M University, and author of The Gospel of Climate Skepticism: Why Evangelical Christians Oppose Action on Climate Change (UC Press, 2019).
Links to each guest's full episode:
Andreas Karelas: 
https://youtu.be/I0e-xIzWKW0 
David Haberman: 
https://youtu.be/xnonKkOL6go 
Robin Veldman: 
https://youtu.be/0FDglcseT5Y 
More information on religion and climate change is available at the Yale Forum on Religion and Ecology website: 
https://fore.yale.edu/Climate-Emergency
Posted 08/02/2021

Reading Jewish Texts in an Age of Climate Change: Grappling with Risk, Reimagining Hope
Julia Watts Belser
Stroum Center for Jewish Studies, University of Washington
2021

How can Jewish texts help us to think through the social politics of the contemporary climate crisis? Bringing feminist disability insights to ancient Jewish narratives, Julia Watts Belser argues that Jewish stories about the destruction of Jerusalem can be a powerful companion for thinking about climate disruption and the contemporary pandemic. This talk will grapple with the politics of risk, examining how race, class, gender, and disability intertwine to force certain bodies to bear the brunt of the storm. It will also explore how these stories invite us to reconsider the spiritual work of navigating tumultuous change so that we can reimagine hope from within the heart of crisis. This talk was given 05/25/2021.

Spotlights ~ Ep. 36, David Haberman, Indiana University Bloomington Part 1
David Haberman
Yale Forum on Religion and Ecology
2021

This week's episode of Spotlights features David Haberman, PhD, Professor and former Chair in the Department of Religious Studies at Indiana University Bloomington. We discuss his wide-ranging work in the field of religion and ecology, with particular attention to his newly released anthology on religion and climate change, Understanding Climate Change Through Religious Lifeworlds (Indiana University Press, 2021). This is the first part of a two-part episode. In part two, we discuss his research into the worship of stones, rivers, and trees in northern India. You can find more information about his work here: https://religiousstudies.indiana.edu/…More information about the book is available on the publisher's website: https://iupress.org/9780253056047/und….
Posted 05/24/2021.

Spotlights ~ Ep. 35, Robin Veldman, Texas A&M University Part 2
Robin Globus Veldman
Forum on Religion and Ecology
2021

This week's episode of the Forum on Religion and Ecology podcast is the second part of a two-part interview with Robin Globus Veldman, PhD, an Assistant Professor of Religious Studies at Texas A&M University, and an Associate Editor for the Journal for the Study of Religion, Nature and Culture. She discusses more about her book on Evangelical Christian perspectives on climate change, The Gospel of Climate Skepticism: Why Evangelical Christians Oppose Action on Climate Change (UC Press, 2019). You can find more information about her work here: https://robingveldman.wixsite.com/mysite More information about her book is available on the publisher's website: https://www.ucpress.edu/book/97805203… This episode was posted 05/17/2021.

Preparing Your Congregation for Climate Disasters
Rev, Caroline Hamilton-Arnold, Mary Ann Sliwinski
Creation Justice Ministries
2021

The question around disasters is not if a disaster will happen here but when—especially as we see climate change increasing the severity and frequency of severe weather events. When disasters occur, congregations can offer vital care and resources for their members and wider communities. Advance preparation and planning can position churches to respond well. As we enter another season of climate-driven disasters, it is time to step back and ask: How can our congregations be hubs of climate resilience, helping our communities weather the spiritual and physical storms of the climate crisis? In this workshop, participants will learn about the domestic and global context of climate disasters, get connected with resources for disaster response and recovery, and engage in conversations and activities for developing context-specific disaster preparedness and response plans.

Spotlights ~ Ep. 34, Robin Veldman, Texas A&M University Part 1
Robin Globus Veldman
Yale Forum on Religion and Ecology
2021

This week's episode of the Forum on Religion and Ecology podcast features Robin Globus Veldman, PhD, an Assistant Professor of Religious Studies at Texas A&M University, and an Associate Editor for the Journal for the Study of Religion, Nature and Culture. She discusses her work at the intersection of religion, culture, and climate change, including the research that went into her book, The Gospel of Climate Skepticism: Why Evangelical Christians Oppose Action on Climate Change (UC Press, 2019). This is the first part of a two-part interview. You can find more information about her work here: https://robingveldman.wixsite.com/mysite​ More information about her book is available on the publisher's website: https://www.ucpress.edu/book/97805203… This episode was posted 05/10/2021. 

Faith as Our Motivator Building Resilience, Pursuing Justice + A Just Transition
Ani Fête Crews, Nana Firman, Rabbi Jennie Rosenn, Rev. Melanie Mullen
ecoAmerica
2021

As we are called to activate our faith communities to bolder climate action, what do we do right now? We must continue talking about climate change as a moral, justice and faith issue in pulpits, educational programming, and in our communities, but we must do more. Faith traditions are deploying powerful new programs and resources and building networks to achieve climate solutions at the local, state and federal level. Hear about these new and innovative efforts to not only activate those already concerned about climate, but to reach others and build a broader base for faithful climate action and advocacy.

Religious Communities and the Planetary Crisis
Rev. Jim Antal, Sofia Gilani, Rabbi Warren Stone, Hari Venkatachalam, Peterson Toscano
Interreligious Ecojustice Network
2021

Faith leaders of various traditions speak together about how they are mobilizing their communities toward action in the face of planetary crisis. With Rev. Jim Antal, UCC; Sofia Gilani, Green Muslims; Rabbi Warren Stone, American Conference of Rabbis; Hari Venkatachalam, Sadhana: Coalition of Progressive Hindus; Peterson Toscano, Citizen's Climate Radio.

“Ending Nukes & Ending Climate Change: The Ethical Responsibility To Mitigate Negative Human Impact On The Environment”
Mary Evelyn Tucker, John Grim, Kehkashan Basu
Voices for a World Free of Nuclear Weapons Youth Team
2021
World Water Day: Water Equity and Climate Resilience
Huda Alkaff, Kori Majeed, Saarah Yasmin Latif
Islamic Society of North America
2021

In this panel on water equity and climate resilience in recognition of World Water Day, three Muslim women environmental activists discuss the principles of environmental justice as they relate to Islamic climate action and issues surrounding water. This event was streamed live on March 22, 2021. 

Youth Climate Justice in India
John Paul Jose
Duke University, Undergraduate Environmental Union
2021

The Environmental Justice Symposium 2021 is happy to present John Paul Jose. Kerala-born John Paul Jose’s journey with environmental activism began when he joined a protest against the Yettinahole project around five years ago. Later, in 2018, John set out to discover what steps India’s politicians were taking to address the climate crisis, as one of the Fridays For Future youth leaders in India. Now 22, he is still a passionate activist, criticising climate action (and the lack of it) from an Indian viewpoint, and especially how global warming affects India’s forests and ecosystems.

Spotlights ~ Ep. 26, The Atlas of Disappearing Places
Christina Conklin
Yale Forum on Religion and Ecology
2021

This week's episode of Spotlights features the artist, researcher, and writer Christina Conklin. She discusses the ways that her work integrates art, data, science, and spirituality, and she talks about her forthcoming book (co-authored with Marina Psaros), The Atlas of Disappearing Places: Our Coasts and Oceans in the Climate Crisis, which will be released this summer. For more about her work, go here. More information on the climate emergency can be found at the website for the Yale Forum on Religion and Ecology. Posted 03/15/2021.

Spotlights ~ Ep.25, Sean Kelly, California Institute of Integral Studies
Sean Kelly
Yale Forum on Religion and Ecology
2021

This week’s episode of Spotlights features Sean Kelly, PhD, professor of Philosophy, Cosmology, and Consciousness at the California Institute of Integral Studies in San Francisco. He discusses his new book, Becoming Gaia: On the Threshold of Planetary Initiation (Integral Imprint, 2021). He describes the interlocking emergencies of climate change, mass extinction, and planetary apartheid in terms of a collective near-death experience (NDE). We talk about the ecological, philosophical, and spiritual implications of this critical moment in human and Earth evolution. Posted 3/8/2021.

2021 Jewish Science and Medical Group Conference, Session 3: Climate Change and Environmental Health
Bernice Reya Rosenzweig, Michael Kosoy, Rabbi Nancy Epstein
Arizona State University
2021

In a session of the 2021 Jewish Science and Medical Group Conference, three Jewish professionals—Bernice Reya Rosenzweig, PhD, Michael Kosoy, PhD, and Rabbi Nancy Epstein—present on climate change and environmental health. Specifically, their discussion touches upon climate change and cities; the inextricable connections between the health of animals, human beings, and our environments; and how public and environmental health relate to Judaism and the sacred. This talk took place on 2/28/2021.

My Neighbor is Hurting: How to Serve Those Experiencing Climate Stress and Grief
ecoAmerica
2021
Climate change is already impacting the mental health of communities nationwide, including the disproportionate impacts of fence line and frontline communities, and youth who are reporting climate anxiety at alarming rates. The faith sector can help. Learn how clergy, lay leaders, and faith communities can build personal AND community resilience in the face of climate change, guidance from mental health experts, and how you can serve your neighbor accordingly.  This episode includes the latest resources on mental health and resilience and an open Q&A with mental health experts.
Us and Us—Centering the Margins of Racial Identity in the Jewish Climate Movement
Kristy Drutman, Nate Looney, Yoshi Silverstein
Big Bold Jewish Climate Fest
2021
As Jews, when we discuss “environmental racism,” conversations and learning often fall into the paradigm of framing the conversation as “Us” (Jews) and “Them” (People of Color). When this framing occurs, even if subconsciously, what assumptions are being made about who Jews are and where do Jews of Color fit in? Join Kristy Drutman (Brown Girl Green), Nate Looney (Avodah), and Yoshi Silverstein (Mitsui Collective) for a conversation on our experiences as Jews of Color working at the intersections of nature connection, environmental activism, farming, service, and Jewish education; and on how the Jewish climate movement must evolve in its relationships and practices both external and internal to Jewish community in order to actualize a green and equitable future. This event was held Friday, January 29, 2021.
Confronting the Climate Crisis with Jewish Values and Spirit
Rabbi Dana Saroken, Rabbi Jennie Rosenn
Dayenu, Beth El Congregation
2021
During the virtual Tu B'Shevat Seder of Beth El Congregation of Baltimore, Rabbi Dana Saroken invited Rabbi Jennie Rosenn (Founder and CEO of Dayenu) to discuss how we can confront the climate crisis with Jewish values and spirit. This event was held on 01/27/2021.
Jain Declaration on Climate Change
Nisha Matamp
2020

How can religion be used to fight against Climate change? This declaration gives direction to the Jains to change their lifestyles in order to live sustainably. Guest speakers: Dr. J. Jina Shah and Sudhanshu Jain.

Episode 59: The Spirituality of Climate Change
Rainn Wilson, Arthur Dahl, Christine Muller, Afsaneh Angelina Rafii
Baha'i Blogcast
2020

In this podcast episode, Rainn Wilson talks about climate change and issues relating to the environment with Arthur Dahl, Christine Muller, and Afsaneh Angelina Rafii. These three Baha'is have been passionately involved in environmentalism in some way, shape, or form, and discuss a range of issues relating to the environment including both practical, and spiritual themes that need to be addressed.

Spotlights ~ Episode 9, Andreas Karelas, Re-volv
Andreas Karelas
Yale Forum on Religion and Ecology
2020

This week’s episode features Andreas Karelas, executive director of RE-volv– a nonprofit organization that empowers communities to invest in solar energy–and author of the new book, Climate Courage: How Tackling Climate Change Can Build Community, Transform the Economy, and Bridge the Political Divide in America (Beacon Press, 2020). Andreas discusses community-oriented solutions to climate change, including the role of wisdom traditions, faith communities, and virtues of courage, simplicity, and gratitude. You can find more information about RE-volve here: https://re-volv.org/. Details about the book Climate Courage can be found here: https://climatecourage.us. Posted 11/16/2020.

Falter: A Conversation with Bill McKibben
Bill McKibben
Georgetown University, Berkeley Center
2020

In this conversation, McKibben and Berkley Center Senior Fellow Paul Elie discussed McKibben’s recent book Falter: Has the Human Game Begun to Play Itself Out? (2019). They also brought into the conversation his 2005 classic Wandering Home: A Long Walk Across America’s Most Hopeful Landscape (which is read by Elie’s first-year students in Georgetown College); the effects and prospects of Pope Francis’s encyclical letter Laudato Si: On Care for Our Common Home; and current climate developments –some of them alarming, others reasons for hope. Georgetown President John J. DeGioia introduced the conversation.

The Moral Imperative for Climate Action
Mary Evelyn Tucker
Cape Cod Climate Change Collaborative
2020

This talk was part of the Net Zero 2020 Conference.

FORUM2020: Science, Spirituality, Climate Emergency, and Our Future
Temple of Understanding
2020

FORUM2020 & the Global Interfaith Prayer Service for the Earth were held on the occasion of the 60th Anniversary of the Temple of Understanding. World religious and spiritual visionaries, Indigenous leaders, scientists, and youth environmental activists came together to address the urgency of the climate crisis with strategies for inspired collective action. Over forty international speakers offered their wisdom and perspectives through keynote addresses, diverse panels, inspiring prayers and sacred music.
To view video, please follow this link.

Spotlights ~ Episode 3, Evan Berry, Arizona State University
Evan Berry
Yale Forum on Religion and Ecology
2020

This week's episode features Evan Berry, an assistant professor of environmental humanities in the School of History, Philosophy, and Religious Studies at Arizona State University. Sam and Evan discuss a variety of topics related to the field of religion and ecology, including the role of religion in the environmental humanities, religious responses to climate change, and the place of religion in the public sphere. Posted 10/5/2020.

Ellen Bernstein on the Climate Emergency
Rabbi Ellen Bernstein
Temple of Understanding
2020

Rabbi Ellen Bernstein, founder of the first national Jewish environmental organization (Shomrei Adamah), discusses her career of thinking about Judaism, the Bible, and ecology. This interview is conducted as part of Temple of Understanding’s Ecojustice for All interview series, which features perspectives on the climate emergency from international movers and shakers. This interview was held on 09/11/2020.

The Climate Emergency
Erin Lothes Biviano
Temple of Understanding
2020

Part of the EcoJustice For All series. 

The Climate Emergency
Rev. Jim Antal
Temple of Understanding
2020
An ECOJUSTICE FOR ALL interview with changemakers around the world—here, Rev. Dr. Jim Antal of the United Church of Christ—on the climate emergency, produced by the Temple of Understanding.
 
“Addressing the Climate Crisis with Economic and Environmental Justice for All”
His Holiness the Dalai Lama
G7 Speakers' Conference
2020
In this video, His Holiness the Dalai Lama calls viewers to pay more attention to global warming. He addresses the need to imagine ourseles as “one human community” rather than as individual beings and places that within the context of global warming. Additionally, he cites examples of how Tibetan people are experiecing global warming, highlighting the seriousness of the issue.
Mosques, Imams, and Climate Action Webinar
Dr Fazlun Khalid, Qari Asim, Dr Iyad Abumoghli, Naeema Hales, Fahmida Khatun, and Kamran Shezad
Bahu Trust
2020

Muslims around the world are concerned about climate change and its impact on humanity. However, many Muslim leaders have been discussing their role, how Islam addresses issues related to climate change and how Muslim leaders can lead a concerted movement to mobilize the larger community across the globe. This webinar, organized in collaboration with the Mosques and Imams National Advisory Board of the United Kingdom, brings together Islamic scholars to discuss the role of Mosques and Imams in the decade of climate action. This event was hosted on November 5th,  2020.

Speakers include: Dr Fazlun Khalid (Founder Director - Islamic Foundation for Ecology & Environmental Sciences - The Urgency For Climate Action - An Islamic Perspective), Qari Asim MBE (Chair - Mosque & Imams National Advisory Board (MINAB) - The Role of Mosques and Imams), Dr Iyad Abumoghli (Director - Faith For Earth, United Nations Environment Programme - Faith For Earth - The Global Potential), Naeema Hales, Outreach Manager (IFEES/EcoIslam - The Role of Muslim Women in Environmental Protection), Fahmida Khatun, TBC (The Hive, Al Madina Mosque, Barking - Environmental Practices in Mosques), Kamran Shezad (Bahu Trust - Host)

Virginia's Calling
Barry Lyons, Linda Nieman, filmmakers
2020
When her faith is challenged by a hurricane, a young evangelical mom must find a new way forward. This film presents her journey with the aim of bringing Christians together to protect God’s creation.
 
Faith for Earth: Climate Change and Environmental Justice
Michael Platzer, Harald Egerer, Jeffrey Sachs, Kiran Bali, Jorge Eduardo Rios, Roberto Manuel Carlés, Thomas Walsh
Coalition of Faith-Based Organizations
2020
Ahead of United Nations World Environment Day, leading environmental experts commended faith based organizations (FBOs) on their efforts to combat climate change, offering recommendations for better collaboration such as increased technological “interchange” and the establishment of platforms which would enable faith and science to better support each other. The discussion took place during KAICIID’s latest webinar on June 4, titled Faith for Earth: Climate Change and Environmental Justice, which was held in cooperation with the Coalition of Faith-Based Organizations, the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) and the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC). Participants addressed pressing environmental issues related to the United Nations Agenda 2030 and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Moderator: Dr. Michael Platzer, Co-chair Coalition of Faith-Based Organizations; Panelists: Dr. Harald Egerer, Head of the UNEP Vienna Office; Jeffrey Sachs, Renowned economist and Director of the Earth Institute; Kiran Bali, Global Chairperson at United Religions Initiative (URI); Jorge Eduardo Rios, Chief of the Global Programme for Combating Wildlife and Forest Crime at UNODC; Prof. Roberto Manuel Carlés, President of the Society of Social Defense; Dr. Thomas Walsh, Chair of the Universal Peace Federation International (UPF) and Co-Chair Coalition of Faith-Based Organizations.
 
For The Earth: The Environment and Social Justice
Keval Shah
The Buddhist Centre
2020
Keval Shah of the Karuna Trust discusses his work in India and Nepal on the intersection of earth-centered awareness with social action, especially in communities where the economic and environmental effects of climate change are often felt first and most strongly. His topics include the tribal communities Karuna works with, and the disruption of their relationships with the natural world; the vulnerability of the communities to the problems of climate change when they contribute the least to emissions; dignified livelihoods, specifically organic vegetable cultivation and farming in Bihar; and future climate resilience work Karuna plans to do.
Can Zoroastrianism Solve Climate Change ? : The FEZANA Talks #1
Farzad Sunavala, Hanoz Suntoke, Karl Desai, Reanna Unwalla, Shahan Engineer
FEZANA
2020

This video is part of the FEZANA Talks series, in which the Zoroastrian community engages with diverse issues across the diaspora. It particularly highlights conversations from the World Zoroastrian Youth Conference in 2019, as four young Zoroastrians discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic and climate change interact. Their talks are followed by an open discussion with the listeners.

“A Call to Action–Protecting Our Common Home”
Dave McGlinchey, Rev. Mariama White-Hammond, Michael Sean Winters, Heather Goldstone
Woods Hole Research Center
2020

Presented by Woods Hole Research Center (WHRC)'s Dave McGlinchey, Rev. Mariama White-Hammond (founding pastor of New Roots AME Church, Boston), and Michael Sean Winters of National Catholic Reporter. Introductory remarks by Heather Goldstone, WHRC's Chief Communications Officer. Pope Francis is marking the 5-year anniversary of Laudato si’, the Catholic Church’s call for “swift and unified global action” to solve the climate crisis. Join us to hear how faith communities are addressing the ecological and moral emergency of climate change. The panelists will also discuss the Faith Science Alliance, in which scientists and faith leaders have found common cause in the climate crisis.

 
A Faith-Based Approach to Address the Biodiversity and Climate Crises
Iyad Abumoghli, Kamran Shezad
Arab Youth Climate Movement Qatar, UNEP Faith for Earth
2020
The Faith-Based Organizations can become increasingly active on environmental issues, as all religions contain messages of environmental care and stewardship for a planet that can provide for human flourishing, with notions of sustainability embedded in religious texts. This can make particularly valuable contributors to the SDGs given the immense influence they have over 80% of the global population who are affiliated to one or another religious or spiritual community, and for many, faith is the main analytical lens that shapes their worldviews. As a part of International Day of Biological Diversity, the Arab Youth Climate Movement Qatar in partnership Faith for Earth, UNEP hosted a webinar and Q&A featuring Dr. Iyad Abumoghli, Director, Faith For Earth Initiative, UN Environment Programme (UNEP) and Kamran Shezad, Climate Change & Sustainability Lead, Bahu Trust, U.K who shared insights on Faith for Earth initiative by UNEP, their approach to engaging with faith leaders & faith-based organizations and Bahu Trust explained their work on Islam & Environment in the U.K. This webinar occcured on May 18, 2020. 
Religion and Foreign Policy Webinar: Religion and Climate Change
Mary Evelyn Tucker
Council on Foreign Relations
2020

Mary Evelyn Tucker, senior lecturer, senior research scholar, and codirector of the Forum of Religion and Ecology at Yale University discusses religion and climate change. Presider: Irina A. Faskianos, Vice President for National Program and Outreach, Council on Foreign Relations.

WIHW 2020 | Climate Panel Presentation
Joshua Basofin, Pastor Beth Brown, John Lee, Caroline Williams, Rabbi Michael Zedek
Parliament of the World's Religions
2020
Programming at the Chicago Interfaith Fair: Our City, Our History, Our Movement February 6, 2020, hosted by the Parliament of the World's Religions in celebration of the United Nations World Interfaith Harmony Week. Learn more about the Parliament and World Interfaith Harmony Week: www.parliamentofreligions.org/wihwThe Parliament’s Director of Climate Action, Joshua Basofin, moderated a panel on the intersection of the interfaith and climate action movements, including Pastor Beth Brown and John Lee from Lincoln Park Presbyterian, Caroline Williams of Chicago Muslims Green Team, and Rabbi Michael Zedek from Emanuel Congregation. This event occurred on February 6, 2020. 
If Not Now, Then What? The Present and Future of Climate Change
Rabbi Fred Scherlinder Dobb, Cassandra Carmichael, Nigel Savage, Joelle Novey
Jewish Council for Public Affairs
2020

Peer-reviewed science offers a clear consensus: that climate change, caused by humans, is an existential threat, and the defining issue of our time. How can the Jewish community–from JCRCs to synagogues to national agencies–step up to meet this challenge? In this session at the JCPA2020 Workshop, top Jewish and interfaith experts offer concrete suggestions on why, how, and with whom to prioritize climate change as a core Jewish communal concern. They discuss the coalitional value of Jewish visibility, especially around environmental justice; the multi-faith promise of a growing response, linking Jewish communities deeply with our Christian, Muslim, and other counterparts; and the intergenerational urgency of staying relevant, as young people around the world lead the charge to address the climate crisis. Moderator: Rabbi Fred Scherlinder Dobb, Coalition on the Environment and Jewish Life (COEJL) Speakers: Cassandra Carmichael, National Religious Partnership for the Environment(NRPE); Nigel Savage, Hazon; Joelle Novey, Interfaith Power and Light for MD-DC-NoVA. This event was held at the JCPA2020 National Conference, held from February 8-11, 2020 in Washington, D.C.

If Not Now, Then What? The Present and Future of Climate Change
Rabbi Fred Scherlinder Dobb, Cassandra Carmichael, Nigel Savage, Joelle Novey
Jewish Council for Public Affairs Workshop
2020

Peer-reviewed science offers a clear consensus: that climate change, caused by humans, is an existential threat, and the defining issue of our time. How can the Jewish community–from JCRCs to synagogues to national agencies–step up to meet this challenge? In this session, top Jewish and interfaith experts offer concrete suggestions on why, how, and with whom to prioritize climate change as a core Jewish communal concern. They discuss the coalitional value of Jewish visibility, especially around environmental justice; the multi-faith promise of a growing response, linking Jewish communities deeply with our Christian, Muslim, and other counterparts; and the intergenerational urgency of staying relevant, as young people around the world lead the charge to address the climate crisis. Moderator: Rabbi Fred Scherlinder Dobb, Coalition on the Environment and Jewish Life (COEJL) Speakers: Cassandra Carmichael, National Religious Partnership for the Environment(NRPE); Nigel Savage, Hazon; Joelle Novey, Interfaith Power and Light for MD-DC-NoVA

Indigenous knowledge meets science to take on climate change
Hindou Oumarou Ibrahim
TEDWomen
2019

To tackle a problem as large as climate change, we need both science and Indigenous wisdom, says environmental activist Hindou Oumarou Ibrahim. In this engaging talk, she shares how her nomadic community in Chad is working closely with scientists to restore endangered ecosystems – and offers lessons on how to create more resilient communities. This talk was recorded on December 6, 2019 at TEDWomen 2019.

Cape Cod Climate Change Conference Part 2
St. Christopher's Episcopal Church, Chatham, MA
2019

From the Second Annual Cape Cod and Islands Faith and Science Forum titled “Climate Change: Taking Action.”

Cape Cod Climate Change Conference Part 01
St. Christopher's Episcopal Church, Chatham, MA
2019

From the Second Annual Cape Cod and Islands Faith and Science Forum titled “Climate Change: Taking Action.”

Indigenous Climate Action: Community-based solutions rooted in decolonization
Eriel Deranger
Climate Atlas of Canada
2019

Real climate solutions are rooted in a return to the land - a return to and of the land - and are rooted in decolonization,” says Eriel Deranger, Executive Director of Indigenous Climate Action (ICA) and member of Athabasca Chipewyan First Nation. ICA is a network of Indigenous peoples framing the ideas and actions regarding climate change in traditional knowledge and community-based solutions. These grassroots actions, Eriel explains, will support the transition to renewable energy while also ensuring social and environmental justice by maintaining and strengthening Indigenous peoples’ connections to language, land and culture.

Can Zoroastrianism Solve Climate Change?
Hanoz Santoke, Farzad Sunavala, Reanna Unwalla
California Zoroastrian Center, World Zoroastrian Youth Congress
2019

Panelists Hanoz Santoke, Farzad Sunavala, and Reanna Unwalla give a thirty minute presentation on how Zoroastrian values relate to what their generation can and should do to address climate change. Drawing on values such as purity and good deeds and Zoroastrian sacred texts such as the creation story, the panelists provide the audience with religious resources and practical ways they can live more sustainably. This panel is followed by a free-flowing discussion with the audience.

VALUING FAITH AND SCIENCE: The Climate Crisis
Ken Kimmell, Katharine Jefferts Schori, Mary Evelyn Tucker
Festival of Faiths
2019

With Ken Kimmell, Katharine Jefferts Schori, and Mary Evelyn Tucker. This session investigates the space where scientific understanding and spiritual wisdom meet to inspire a global response to one of our world’s most urgent crises. What can we learn from faith and science about right relationship with our Mother Earth? Thought leaders share current global warming science and insights on generating the necessary human response. This event took place at the 2019nFestoval of Faiths: Sacred Cosmos: Faith and Science April 25-27, 2019.

“The Enyclical is our Invitation”
Mary Evelyn Tucker
Festival of Faiths, 2019
2019

From the session: “VALUING FAITH AND SCIENCE: The Climate Crisis” at the Festival of Faiths 2019: Sacred Cosmos: Faith and Science (April 25-27, 2019). The 2019 festival explores the wisdom present at the intersection of faith and science. A diverse lineup of speakers and artists examine ancient and modern questions at the heart of human existence, investigate the space where reason and revelation co-exist, and engage with contemporary topics of concern through the teachings of enduring faith traditions.

Beyond Despair and Denial: Facing Climate Change with Moral Urgency and Hope
Greg Sterling, Clifton Granby, Codi Norred, Jon Sawyer, Mary Evelyn Tucker
Yale Divinity School
2019

A public conversation at the The Cathedral of St. Philip in Atlanta, GA focused on ethical solutions and practical strategies for building a movement that meets the climate crisis. Introduction by Greg Sterling, Dean of Yale Divinity School Presenters: Clifton Granby, Assistant Professor of Ethics and Philosophy at Yale Divinity School; Codi Norred, Program Director of Georgia Interfaith Power & Light; Jon Sawyer ‘74, Founding Director of the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting; Mary Evelyn Tucker, Co-Director of the Forum on Religion and Ecology at Yale. This event took place on March 12, 2019.

Religious Perspectives & Moral Obligation
Mary Evelyn Tucker
Saint Louis University
2018

Saint Louis University hosted the Saint Louis Climate Summit, April 22-24, 2018, as part of its bicentennial anniversary celebration and to honor Pope Francis’ call to unite leaders in defense of the health and well-being of the planet.

St. Francis Xavier College Church Panel Discussion 2
Peter Raven, Mary Evelyn Tucker
Nine PBS
2018

Peter Raven, Ph.D., and Mary Evelyn Tucker, Ph.D. were featured speakers at the Saint Louis Climate Summit at St. Francis Xavier College Church on April 22, 2018. Saint Louis University hosted the Saint Louis Climate Summit, April 22-24, 2018, as part of its bicentennial anniversary celebration and to honor Pope Francis’ call to unite leaders in defense of the health and well-being of the planet.

St. Francis Xavier College Church Panel Discussion 1
Peter Raven, Mary Evelyn Tucker
Nine PBS
2018

Peter Raven, Ph.D., and Mary Evelyn Tucker, Ph.D. were featured speakers at the Saint Louis Climate Summit at St. Francis Xavier College Church on April 22, 2018. Saint Louis University hosted the Saint Louis Climate Summit, April 22-24, 2018, as part of its bicentennial anniversary celebration and to honor Pope Francis’ call to unite leaders in defense of the health and well-being of the planet.

Indigenous Peoples and Climate Justice
Kyle Whyte
Spring Creek Project, Oregon State University
2018

In his lecture “Indigenous Peoples and Climate Justice,” Kyle Powys Whyte showcases indigenous leadership in the climate justice movement and illustrates the unique and grave threat climate change poses to indigenous experiences and ways of life. Climate change is not a new phenomenon for indigenous people, he explains. There are long-standing traditions in indigenous cultures that enable societies to respond to seasonal and inter-annual climate variability. Indigenous people have also already experienced climate change through their endurance of colonialism. Whyte describes how the current threat to indigenous people is a continuation of colonialism and how the consciousness gained from their prior experience with climate change can provide sound leadership for confronting the problem today. This talk is a part of the Bedrock Lectures on Human Rights and Climate Change presented by the Spring Creek Project. This talk was delivered on April 18, 2018.

Climate Change and Ecojustice
Rabbi Lawrence Troster
TorahTrek: The Center for Jewish Wilderness Spirituality eJournal
2018
Rabbi Lawrence Troster, one of the leading thinkers on Judaism and the environment, speaks about climate change as a moral challenge and explores the Jewish duty to work for eco-justice.
Follow link to view video
Climate Change and Ecojustice: Video Interview
Rabbi Lawrence Troster
TorahTrek: The Center for Jewish Wilderness Spirituality eJournal
2018
Rabbi Lawrence Troster, one of the leading thinkers on Judaism and the environment, speaks about climate change as a moral challenge and explores the Jewish duty to work for eco-justice.

Follow link to view video.

The Indigenous: The Frontline - Change for Climate Talks
Eriel Tchekwie Deranger
City of Edmonton
2017

This Change for Climate Talk features Eriel Tchekwie Deranger. Eriel is a co-founder and the Executive Director of Indigenous Climate Action, Canada's only Indigenous-led climate justice social movement organization. She is also a Dene Indigenous rights advocate, activist, and member of the Athabasca Chipewyan First Nation (ACFN) of Northern Alberta, Canada, downstream of Alberta's Tar Sands. She talks about how the lands Indigenous Peoples are advocating to protect are important globally and culturally, and why Indigenous Peoples are a critical part of protecting lands and making an impact on climate change. Change for Climate Talks are short and inspiring presentations by local community leaders who want to share their ideas on how we can act on climate change. This presentation was filmed during the first Change for Climate Talks on Dec. 9, 2017. Find many other ways you can act on climate change by visiting http://changeforclimate.ca.

Indigenous Peoples & Climate Change
Sylvia McAdam, Desmond Bull, Melina Laboucan-Massimo, Ellen Gabriel, Sylvia McAdam, Kevin Settee, Eriel Deranger, Clayton Thomas-Muller, Erica-Violet Lee, Danika Littlechild, Grand Chief Derek Nepinak
Indigenous Climate Action
2017

Indigenous Climate Action (ICA) is an Indigenous-led organization guided by a diverse group of Indigenous knowledge keepers, water protectors and land defenders from communities and regions across the country. We believe that Indigenous Peoples’ rights and knowledge systems are critical to developing solutions to the climate crisis and achieving climate justice. To learn more about ICA, visit their website here: www.indigenousclimateaction.com. This video was posted Feb 4, 2017. 

Indigenous Peoples & Climate Change
Indigenous Climate Action
2017

Names in order of appearance: Sylvia McAdam, a citizen of the nêhiyaw Nation, Treaty 4 Desmond Bull, Louis Bull First Nation, Treaty 6 Melina Laboucan-Massimo, Lubicon Cree First Nation, Treaty 8 Ellen Gabriel, Mohawk - Kanien'kehá:ka Nation, Quebec Sylvia McAdam, ibid Kevin Settee, Treaty 1 Eriel Deranger, Athabasca Chipewyan First Nation, Treaty 8 Clayton Thomas-Muller, Mathais Colomb Cree Nation, Treaty 6, Manitoba Erica-Violet Lee, Student, Indigenous feminist, Saskatchewan Danika Littlechild, Maskwacis, Treaty 6, Alberta Grand Chief Derek Nepinak, Pine Creek First Nation, Treaty 4, Manitoba.

Climate Change, Traditional Knowledge, and Environmental Justice
Kyle Whyte
York University
2016

The first of its kind in Canada, the Indigenous Environmental Justice Symposium knowledge sharing symposium was held on May 26, 2016 to advance the theory and practice of EJ scholarship by engaging with Indigenous peoples to more fully develop the concept of “justice” and the policies and laws necessary to enable just relations. The IEJ symposium creates a forum to share ideas, knowledge and experiences to help us understand what environmental justice means. Furthermore, if EJ studies are to benefit Indigenous peoples, then they must include knowledge, principles and values already held and practiced by Indigenous peoples. An important way to include and hear the voices and experiences of Indigenous peoples is to engage directly in sharing knowledge through an IEJ symposium. The IEJ symposium brought together activists, youth, women, artists, Elders, scholars, leaders, environmental practitioners, activists, advocates and community members.

“After Paris: Climate and Religion”
Mary Evelyn Tucker
David Brower Center, California Interfaith Power & Light
2016

(NOTE: AUDIO ONLY)

Symposium on Religion and Climate Change Panel 1
Mary Evelyn Tucker, Willis Jenkins, Michael Kessler, Akbar Ahmed, Julia Watts Belser, Drew Christiansen,
Georgetown University, Berkley Center
2015

Following Pope Francis's historic visit to the United States and just a month before the momentous COP21 climate negotiations in Paris, the Berkley Center, in collaboration with the State Department, assembled a group of faith leaders, representatives of faith-based NGOs, scholars, and government policymakers to address the complex intersection of faith, science, and policy that surrounds the challenge of global climate change. Two panels addressed the moral and theological underpinnings of the climate action movement, and the connections between climate, justice, and poverty. This event took place on November 9, 2015.

Indigenous Climate Justice Symposium: Fossil Fuel Connections Panel
Zoltán Grossman, Fawn Sharp, Kandi Mossett, Jeremiah "Jay" Julius, Adriann Killsnight
Evergreen State College
2015

This panel was held on November 6, 2015 at the Evergreen State College in Olympia, WA during the first annual Indigenous Climate Justice Symposium. The panel, entitled “Fossil Fuel Connections: Tribal voices from the front and back ends of the oil & coal train routes”, consisted of Fawn Sharp, Kandi Mossett, Jeremiah “Jay” Julius, Adriann Killsnight; and Zoltán Grossman, as the moderator. The Symposium was a part of the Climate Change and Pacific Rim Indigenous Nations Project at Evergreen, founded by the Northwest Indian Applied Research Institute (NIARI) in 2006.

“Religious Education in the Era of Climate Change: A Summit of Conscience”
Mary Evelyn Tucker
Interfaith Center for Sustainable Development
2015

Dr. Mary Evelyn Tucker, co-director of the Forum on Religion and Ecology at Yale, discusses how to promote teaching on faith and ecology within seminaries. In light of the great challenges we are facing, what role can religion play? Stewarding creation is something that the next generation of seminary students must address, and this video shares a number of ideas for how to engage seminaries to teach more on faith and ecology. This event took place on November 4, 2015. 
Event webpage

“A Compassionate Science: Pope Francis, Climate Change and the Fate of Creation”
Stephen Scharper
St. Vincent de Paul Church, Baltimore
2015

In Part 1 of “The Cry of the Earth: How Pope Francis Calls Us to the Science Faith, and Action of Saving Our Common Home”, St. Vincent (co-sponsored by St. Ignatius Catholic Community) presents presents Dr. Stephen Scharper: Climate change science has emerged in the last three decades as one of the most vexed and contentious areas of contemporary research. From the muzzling of environmental scientists in Canada to the censorship of leading climate change researchers in the United States, politics has tinctured, tethered, and at times eclipsed scientific data on one of the most important issues of our times. In his pioneering encyclical “Laudato Si,” Pope Francis takes on the climate change issue, directly utilizing contemporary scientific research on climate change and its effects, such as global warming, rising sea levels, the acidification of oceans, and species lost. This talk explores a series of questions: What role can a Catholic voice play in the science climate change debate? Does Pope Francis have unique credentials for addressing climate change science? Does climate change science challenge people of faith to a deeper understanding of their relationship to and responsibilities for creation?

“Pope, Paris and the SDGs: What’s driving business to act on climate change now?”
Peter Bakker, Frances Beinecke, Pavan Sukhdev, Mary Evelyn Tucker, Brad Gentry
Yale Center for Business and the Environment
2015

What has shifted in relation to business sustainability leadership and what is compelling companies to act now? In this interactive dialogue facilitated by Brad Gentry, panelists will discuss these questions among others, bringing to light new opportunities for business to mitigate climate change and contribute to the global sustainable development priorities. Featuring: Peter Bakker (President & CEO, WBCSD); Frances Beinecke (Former President, NRDC; Scholar, Yale); Pavan Sukhdev (Founder & CEO, GIST Advisory; Author); Mary Evelyn Tucker (Scholar of Religion and the Environment, Yale); Moderated by Brad Gentry (Associate Dean for Professional Practice, Yale; Director, Yale Center for Business and the Environment).

“Dear World”
NextGen America
2015

Pope Francis has called on people of all faiths to come together to take action on climate change and protect “our common home.” Will you join him?

Embracing Our Common Future: An Interfaith Call to Action on Climate Change
Kusumita Pedersen
Parliament of the World's Religions
2015
Climate Change Plenary
Chief Arvol Lookinghorse
Parliament of the World's Religions
2015

Chief Arvol Lookinghorse, 19th Generation Keeper of the Sacred White Buffalo Calf Pipe speaks during the Climate Change Plenary at the 2015 Parliament of the World's Religions in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Connecting Hearts on Climate Change
Parliament of the World’s Religions
2015

Every religious, spiritual and faith tradition views earth through a sacred lens and teaches adherents to protect the environment and all forms of life on our planet. At a vital moment in history, the Global Interfaith Movement and the Environmental Movement Join Forces at the Parliament of the World's Religions in Salt Lake City on October 15 - 19, 2015.

EcoSikh: A Sikh Response to Climate Change
EcoSikh
2015

A review of EcoSikh efforts in 2015 to combat climate change and engage Sikhs around the world to take environmental action.

Religion's Role in the nation's climate change conversation
Mary Evelyn Tucker
George Washington University, US Buddhist Leaders’ Conference
2015

Dr. Mary Evelyn Tucker of the Yale Forum for Religion and Ecology discusses the contributions people of faith in general and Buddhists in particular can bring to the national conversation on climate change. This talk was part of the US Buddhist Leaders’ Conference held at George Washington University and the White House in Washington DC on May 14, 2015.

“Spiritual and Sustainable: Religion Responds to Climate Change
Dan McKanan, Lama Willa Miller, Rabbi Shoshana Meira, Munjed M. Murad, Rev. Margaret Bullitt-Jonas, Rev. Dr. Jim Antal, Tim DeChristopher
Harvard Divinity School
2014

This interfaith conference addresses the issues and challenges of maintaining a sustainable planet. Focused on ways to engage, panelists examines the overlapping moral issues of climate change, sustainability, social justice, and mindfulness through the lenses of many of the world's religious traditions. Dan McKanan, Ralph Waldo Emerson Unitarian Universalist Association Senior Lecturer in Divinity, Harvard Divinity School; Lama Willa Miller, Founder and Spiritual Director of Natural Dharma Fellowship and a Buddhist Climate Activist; Rabbi Shoshana Meira Friedman, Graduate of Hebrew College Rabbinical School with a background in environmental studies and education; Munjed M. Murad, ThD Candidate, Harvard Divinity School and Junior Fellow, Center for the Study of World Religions; Rev. Margaret Bullitt-Jonas, Missioner for Creation Care, Episcopal Diocese of Western Massachusetts; Rev. Dr. Jim Antal, Climate Activist, Conference Minister, and President, Massachusetts Conference, United Church of Christ; Tim DeChristopher, Climate Activist, Unitarian Universalist, and MDiv Candidate, Harvard Divinity School; Q&A with the panelists, moderated by Dan McKanan.

“Climate Change: Faith and Fact”
Katharine Hayhoe, Bill Moyers
Moyers & Co.
2014

Christian and climate scientist Katharine Hayhoe talks to Bill about ending the gridlock between politics, science and faith.

Eco-Buddhism & Mindfulness: Building a Climate Justice Movement
Antwi Akom
Mill Valley Library
2013
As part of the Mill Valley Library First Friday series, and through the lens of the United States’ history of institutionalized (including environmental) racism, Antwi Akom presents on both eco-Buddhism and mindfulness, and building a climate justice movement.
Keynote 1st Annual “Our Children, Climate, Faith” Symposium
Mary Evelyn Tucker
2013

This event was held August 16-17, 2013 in Strafford, Vermont. 

Religion and the Environment
PBS Religion and Ethics Newsweekly
2013

Interfaith Power and Light brings together people of different faiths to be better stewards of creation by responding to global warming and by supporting changes in environmental public policy. This video features interviews with various leaders of different religions from throughout the United States, highlighting what work their faith communities are doing, why they are compelled to do this work, and how they are engaging their communities to be better stewards of creation.

350.org International Day of Climate Action
Mary Evelyn Tucker
Parliament of the World’s Religions
2009

Mary Evelyn Tucker discusses her work on 350.org, which seeks to activate religious communities around the world to take action against climate change. She emphasizes ways in which religious communities can contribute to the climate change conversation and the need for ecojustice to be centered in climate change discussions. This was filmed at the Parliament of the World's Religions in Melbourne, Australia.

Pt. 3 The Human Face of Climate Change
Mary Evelyn Tucker
Parliament of the World’s Religions
2009

(See part 1 for talk description)

Pt. 2 The Human Face of Climate Change
Mary Evelyn Tucker
Parliament of the World’s Religions
2009

(See part 1 for talk description)

Pt. 1 The Human Face of Climate Change
Mary Evelyn Tucker
Parliament of the World’s Religions
2009

At the Parliament of World's Religions in 2009 in Melbourne, Australia, Mary Evelyn Tucker gives a talk on what religions contribute to the conversations and action around climate change. She comments that religions have a unique response to climate change, as they offer a sense of awe, wonder, and beauty in how people think about the earth and as they bring spiritual energy that can sustain action. Even though religions are late in coming to the issue of climate change, Tucker gives various examples of religious groups around the world rethinking their environmental ethics and taking action towards a more resilient future.