Home » Religion » Buddhism » Here

Bibliography - Part 2


Buddhism and Ecology Bibliography

Chris Ives, Stonehill College
and Duncan Ryuken Williams, Trinity College

 

View a PDF version of this bibliography.

View an annotated PDF version of this bibliography.



Please send corrections and additions to Chris Ives: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Click here for Bibliography - Part 1.

 

LaFleur, William R. “Sattva—Enlightenment for Plants and Trees.” In Dharma Gaia: A Harvest of Essays in Buddhism and Ecology, ed. Allan Hunt Badiner, 136–44. Berkeley, Calif.: Parallax Press, 1990.

 

_____. “Saigyo and the Buddhist Value of Nature.” Parts 1 and 2. History of Religions 13, no. 2 (November 1973): 93–127; no. 3 (February 1974): 227–47. Reprinted in Nature in Asian Traditions of Thought: Essays in Environmental Philosophy, eds. J. Baird Callicott and Roger T. Ames, 183–209 (Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1989).

 

Lakanaricharan, Sureerat. “The State and Buddhist Philosophy in Resource Conflicts and Conservation in Northern Thailand.” Ph.D. diss., University of California, Berkeley, California, 1995.

 

Langford, Donald Stewart. “The Primacy of Place in Gary Snyder’s Ecological Vision.” Ph.D. diss., Ohio State University, 1993.

 

Larson, Gerald James. “‘Conceptual Resources’ in South Asia for ‘Environmental Ethics.’” In Nature in Asian Traditions of Thought: Essays in Environmental Philosophy, ed. J. Baird Callicott and Roger T. Ames, 267–77. Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1989.

 

Leighton, Taigen Dan. “Buddhist Perspectives in Response to Climate Damage.” Currents, Fall 2014.

 

_____. "Now the Whole World Has Its Head on Fire.” In A Buddhist Response to the Climate Emergency, edited by John Stanley, David R. Loy, and Gyurme Dorje, 187-94. Somerville: Wisdom Publications, 2009.

 

Leopold, Aldo. A Sand County Almanac. New York: Oxford University Press, 1969.

 

Lesco, Phillip A. “To Do No Harm: A Buddhist View on Animal Use in Research.” Journal of Religion and Health 27, no. 4 (winter 1988): 307–12.

 

Levitt, Peter. “For the Trees.” Ten Directions (spring-summer 1993): 34–35. Reprinted in Turning Wheel (spring 1994): 25–26.

 

_____. “An Intimate View.” In Dharma Gaia: A Harvest of Essays in Buddhism and Ecology, ed. Allan Hunt Badiner, 93–96. Berkeley, Calif.: Parallax Press, 1990.

 

Ling, T. O. “Buddhist Factors in Population Growth and Control: A Survey Conducted in Thailand and Ceylon.” Population Studies 23, no. 1 (March 1969): 53–60.

 

Lodrick, Deryck O. Sacred Cows, Sacred Places: Origins and Survivals of Animal Homes in India. Berkeley, Calif.: University of California Press, 1981.

 

Lohmann, Larry. “Visitors to the Commons: Approaching Thailand’s ‘Environmental’ Struggles from a Western Starting Point.” In Ecological Resistance Movements: The Global Emergence of Radical and Popular Environmentalism, ed. Bron Raymond Taylor, 109–26. Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1995.

 

_____. “Green Orientalism.” Ecologist 23, no. 6 (1993): 202–204.

 

_____. “Who Defends Biological Diversity? Conservation Strategies and the Case of Thailand.” In Biodiversity: Social and Ecological Perspectives, ed. Vandana Shiva, 77–104. Penang: World Rainforest Movement; London: Zed, 1991.

 

Loori, John Daido. The Way of Mountains and Rivers: Teachings on Zen and the Environment. Mt. Tremper, NY: Dharma Communications, 2009.

 

_____. Teachings of the Earth: Zen and the Environment. Boston: Shambhala, 2007.

 

_____.  “Mountains Meeting Mountains.” Mountain Record, Fall 2006: 2-40.

 

_____. “River Seeing the River.” In Dharma Rain: Sources of Buddhist Environmentalism, edited by Kaza and Kraft, 141-50. Boston: Shambhala, 2000.

 

_____. Teachings of the Insentient: Zen and the Environment. Mt. Tremper: Dharma Communications Press, 1999.

 

_____. “The Precepts and the Environment.” In Buddhism and Ecology: The Interconnection of Dharma and Deeds, edited by Mary Evelyn Tucker and Duncan Ryūken Williams, 177-84. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1997.

 

_____. “River Seeing the River.” Mountain Record (spring 1996): 2–10.

 

_____. “Being Born as the Earth: Excerpts from a Spirited Dharma Combat with John Daido Loori.” Mountain Record (winter 1992): 14–18.

 

_____. “The Sacred Teachings of Wilderness: A Dharma Discourse on the Living Mandala of Mountains and Rivers.” Mountain Record (winter 1992): 2–9.

 

_____. “Born as the Earth.” Mountain Record (winter 1991): 2–10.

 

Loy, David R. A New Buddhist Path: Enlightenment, Evolution, and Ethics in the Modern World. Boston: Wisdom Publications, 2015.

 

_____. “Awakening in the Age of Climate Change.” Tricycle, Spring 2015. http://tricycle.org/magazine/awakening-age-climate-change/

 

_____. Money, Sex, War, Karma: Notes for a Buddhist Revolution.  Boston: Wisdom Publications, 2008.

 

_____. “Loving the World As Our Own Body: The Nondualist Ethic of Taoism, Buddhism, and Deep Ecology.” The Great Awakening: A Buddhist Social Theory, 171-194. Boston: Wisdom Publications, 2003.


_____. The Great Awakening: A Buddhist Social Theory.  Boston: Wisdom            Publications, 2003.

 

_____. “The Religion of the Market.” In Visions of a New Earth: Religious Perspectives on Population, Consumption and Ecology, edited by Harold Coward and Daniel C, Maguire, 15-28. Albany: State University of New York Press, 1999.

 

Loy, David, and Bhikkhu Bodhi, “The Time to Act is Now: A Buddhist Declaration on Climate Change.” May 14, 2015. http://www.ecobuddhism.org/bcp/all_content/buddhist_declaration/

 

Loy, David, and John Stanley. “At the Edge of the Roof: The Evolutionary Crisis of the Human Spirit.” In Spiritual Ecology: The Cry of the Earth, edited by Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee, 37-46. Point Reyes, CA: Golden Sufi Center, 2013.

 

_____. “Buddhism and the End of Economic Growth.” The Huffington Post, September 19, 2011. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/john-stanley/buddhism-and-economic-growth_b_954457.html

 

_____. “Occupy the Climate Emergency!” http://www.ecobuddhism.org/wisdom/editorials/oce

 

Macy, Joanna. “Schooling Our Intention.” Tricycle 3, no. 2 (winter 1993): 48–51.

 

_____. Mutual Causality in Buddhism and General Systems Theory: The Dharma of Natural Systems. Albany: State University of New York Press, 1991.

 

_____. World as Lover, World as Self. Berkeley, Calif.: Parallax Press, 1991.

 

_____. “The Ecological Self: Postmodern Ground for Right Action.” In Sacred Interconnections: Postmodern Spirituality, Political Economy, and Art, ed. David Ray Griffin, 35–48. Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1990.

 

_____. “The Greening of the Self.” In Dharma Gaia: A Harvest of Essays in Buddhism and Ecology, ed. Allan Hunt Badiner, 53–63. Berkeley, Calif.: Parallax Press, 1990.

 

_____. “Guardians of Gaia.” Yoga Journal (November-December 1989): 53–55.

 

_____. “Empowerment beyond Despair: A Talk by Joanna Macy on the Greening of the Self.” Vajradhatu Sun 11, no. 4 (April-May 1989): 1, 3, 14.

 

_____. “Deep Ecology and Spiritual Practice.” One Earth (autumn 1989): 18–21.

 

_____. “In Indra’s Net.” In The Path of Compassion: Writings on Socially Engaged Buddhism, ed. Fred Eppsteiner, 170–81. Berkeley, Calif.: Parallax Press, 1988.

 

_____. “Sacred Waste.” Buddhist Peace Fellowship Newsletter 10, nos. 3–4 (fall 1988): 22–23.

 

_____. Dharma and Development: Religion as Resource in the Sarvodaya Self-Help Movement. Rev. ed. West Hartford, Conn.: Kumarian Press, 1985.

 

_____. “Interdependence in the Nuclear Age: An Interview with Joanna Macy by Stephan Bodian.” Karuna (fall 1985): 8–9.

 

_____. Despair and Personal Power in the Nuclear Age. Philadelphia, Pa.: New Society Publishers, 1983.

 

Macy, Joanna, and Molly Young Brown. Coming Back to Life: Practices to Reconnect Our Lives, Our World. Gabriola Island, B.C., Canada: New Society Publishers, 1998.

 

Maezumi, Taizan. “A Half Dipper of Water.” Ten Directions (spring-summer 1990): 11–12.

 

_____. “The Buddha Seed Grows Consciously: The Precept of Non-killing.” Ten Directions, (spring 1985): 1, 4.

 

Martin, Julia, ed. Ecological Responsibility: A Dialogue With Buddhism. Delhi, India: Tibet House, 1997.

 

McClellan, John. “Nondual Ecology.” Tricycle 3, no. 2 (winter 1993): 58–65.

 

McDaniel, Jay B. “Revisioning God and the Self: Lessons from Buddhism.” In Liberating Life: Contemporary Approaches to Ecological Theology, eds. Charles Birch, William Eakin, and Jay B. McDaniel, 228–57. Maryknoll, N.Y.: Orbis, 1990.

 

McDermott, James P. “Animals and Humans in Early Buddhism.” Indo-Iranian Journal 32, no. 2 (1989): 269–80.

 

McMahan, David L. The Making of Buddhist Modernism. New York: Oxford University Press, 2008.

 

Metzger, Deena. “Four Meditations.” In Dharma Gaia: A Harvest of Essays in Buddhism and Ecology, ed. Allan Hunt Badiner, 209–12. Berkeley, Calif.: Parallax Press, 1990.

 

_____. “The Buddha of the Beasts.” Creation, May-June 1989, 25.

Mickey, Sam. Whole Earth Thinking and Planetary Coexistence: Ecological Wisdom at the Intersection of Religion, Ecology, and Philosophy. New York: Routledge, 2015.

 

Mininberg, Mark Sando. “Sitting with the Environment.”Mountain Record (winter 1993): 44–47.

Mitchell, Donald, and William Skudlarek, eds. Green Monasticism: A Buddhist-Catholic

Response to an Environmental Calamity. Brooklyn: Lantern Books, 2010.


Miyakawa, Akira. “Man and Nature or in Nature?” Dharma World 21 (March-April 1994): 47–49.

 

Morgante, Amy, ed. Buddhist Perspectives on the Earth Charter. Cambridge, Mass.: Boston Research Center for the 21st Century, 1997.

 

Mossley, David J. “Bashō, 1644-94.” In Fifty Key Thinkers on the Environment, ed. Joy A. Palmer, 51-56. New York: Routledge, 2001.

 

Murphy, Susan. Minding the Earth, Mending the World: Zen and the Art of Planetary Crisis. Berkeley: Counterpoint, 2014.

 

_____. “The Koan of the Earth.” In Spiritual Ecology: The Cry of the Earth, edited by Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee, 109-25. Point Reyes, CA: Golden Sufi Center, 2013.


Naess, Arne. “Mountains and Mythology.” In The Sacred Mountains of Asia, ed. John Einarsen, 89. Boston: Shambhala Press, 1995.

 

_____. “Self-Realization: An Ecological Approach to Being in the World.” In Thinking Like a Mountain: Toward a Council of All Beings, eds. John Seed, Joanna Macy, and Arne Naess, 19–30. Philadelphia, Pa.: New Society Publishers, 1988.

 

_____. “Interview with Arne Naess.” In Deep Ecology: Living As If Nature Mattered, eds. Bill Duvall and George Sessions, 74–76. Salt Lake City, Utah: Peregrine Smith, 1985.

 

Nagabodhi. “Buddhism and the Environment.” Golden Drum: A Magazine for Western Buddhists (February-April 1990): 3.

 

_______.  “Buddhism and Vegetarianism.” Golden Drum: A Magazine for Western Buddhists (August-October 1989): 3.

 

Nakasone, Ronald Y. Ethics of Enlightenment: Essays and Sermons in Search of a Buddhist Ethic. Freemont, CA: Dharma Cloud Publishers, 1990.

 

Naravan, Raideva and Janardan Kumar, eds. Ecology and Religion: Ecological Concepts in Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, Islam, Christianity and Sikhism. In Collaboration with Institute for Socio-Legal Studies, Muzaffarpur, Bihar. New Delhi: Deep & Deep Publications Pvt. Ltd., 2003.

 

Nash, Nancy. “The Buddhist Perception of Nature Project.” In Tree of Life: Buddhism and the Protection of Nature, ed. Shann Davies, 31–33. Hong Kong: Buddhist Perception of Nature Project, 1987.

 

Natadecha-Sponsel, Poranee. “Nature and Culture in Thailand: The Implementation of Cultural Ecology and Environmental Education through the Application of Behavioral Sociology.” Ph.D. diss., University of Hawaii, 1991.

 

_____. “Buddhist Religion and Scientific Ecology as Convergent Perceptions of Nature.” In Essays on Perceiving Nature, ed. Diana M. DeLuca, 113–18. Honolulu, Hawaii: Perceiving Nature Conference Committee, 1988.

 

Newbury, Roxy Keien. “The Green Container: Taking Care of the Garbage.” Mountain Record (winter 1991): 51–53.

 

Nhat Hanh, Thich. Love Letter to the Earth. Berkeley: Parallax Press, 2013.

 

_____. The World We Have: A Buddhist Approach to Peace and Ecology. Berkeley: Parallax Press, 2008.

 

_____. For a Future to Be Possible: Commentaries on the Five Wonderful Precepts. Berkeley, Calif.: Parallax Press, 1993.

 

_____. Love in Action: Writings on Nonviolent Social Change. Berkeley, Calif.: Parallax Press, 1993.

 

_____. “Look Deep and Smile: The Thoughts and Experiences of a Vietnamese Monk.” In Buddhism and Ecology, eds. Martine Batchelor and Kerry Brown, 100–109. London: Cassell, 1992.

 

_____. Peace Is Every Step: The Path of Mindfulness in Everyday Life, ed. Arnold Kotler. New York: Bantam, 1991.

 

_____. “The Last Tree.” In Dharma Gaia: A Harvest of Essays in Buddhism and Ecology, ed. Allan Hunt Badiner, 217–21. Berkeley, Calif.: Parallax Press, 1990.

 

_____. “Seeing All Beings with the Eyes of Compassion.” Karuna: A Journal of Buddhist Meditation (summer-fall 1990): 6–10.

 

_____. “The Individual, Society, and Nature.” In The Path of Compassion: Writings on Socially Engaged Buddhism, ed. Fred Eppsteiner, 40–46. Berkeley, Calif.: Parallax Press, 1988.

 

_____. Interbeing: Commentaries on the Tiep Hien Precepts. Berkeley, Calif.: Parallax Press, 1987.

 

_____. Being Peace. Berkeley, Calif.: Parallax Press, 1987.

 

Nhat Hanh, Thich, et al. A Joyful Path: Community Transformation and Peace. Berkeley, Calif.: Parallax Press, 1994.

 

_____. For a Future to Be Possible: Commentaries on the Five Wonderful Precepts. Berkeley, Calif.: Parallax Press, 1993.

 

Nisker, Wes. Buddha’s Nature: A Practical Guide to Discovering Your Place in the Cosmos. New York: Bantam Books, 1998.

 

Nolan, Kathy Fusho. “The Great Earth.” Mountain Record (spring 1996): 70–72.

 

Norberg-Hodge, Helena. "Buddhism and the Global Economy." Turning Wheel, Spring 1997: 13-17.

 

_____. “May a Hundred Plants Grow from One Seed: The Ecological Tradition of Ladakh Meets the Future.” In Buddhism and Ecology, eds. Martine Batchelor and Kerry Brown, 41–54. London: Cassell, 1992.

 

_____. Ancient Futures: Learning from Ladakh. San Francisco, Calif.: Sierra Club Books, 1991.

 

Ophuls, William.“Notes for a Buddhist Politics.” In Dharma Rain: Sources of Buddhist Environmentalism, edited by Stephanie Kaza and Kenneth Kraft, 369-78.  Boston: Shambhala Publications, 2000.

 

_____. “Buddhist Politics.” Ecologist 7, no. 3 (1977): 82–86.

 

O'Reilley, Mary Rose. The Barn at the End of the World: The Apprenticeship of a Quaker, Buddhist Shepherd. Minneapolis: Milkweed Editions, 2000.

 

Page, Tony. Buddhism and Animals: A Buddhist Vision of Humanity's Rightful Relationship with the Animal Kingdom. London: UVAKIS Publications, 1999.

 

Pallis, Marco. Peaks and Lamas: A Classic Book on Mountaineering, Buddhism and Tibet. Berkeley: Counterpoint, 2004.

 

Palmer, Martin and Victoria Finlay. Faith in Conservation: New Approaches to Religions and the Environment. Washington, DC: The International Bank for Reconstruction and Development/ The World Bank, 2003.

 

Parkes, Graham. “Kūkai and Dōgen as Exemplars of Ecological Engagement.” Journal of Japanese Philosophy 1 (2013): 85-110.

 

_____. “Dōgen’s ‘Mountains and Waters as Sūtras’ (Sansui-kyō).” In Buddhist Philosophy: Essential Readings, edited by William Edelglass and Jay Garfield, 83-92. New York: Oxford University Press, 2009.

 

_____. “Voices of Mountains, Trees, and Rivers: Kūkai, Dōgen, and a Deeper Ecology.”  In Buddhism and Ecology: The Interconnection of Dharma and Deeds, edited by Mary Evelyn Tucker and Duncan Ryūken Williams, 111-28. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1997.

 

Pauling, Chris. “A Buddhist Life Is a Green Life.” Golden Drum: A Magazine for Western Buddhists (February-April 1990): 5–7.

 

Payne, Richard K., ed. How Much is Enough?  Buddhism, Consumerism, and the Human Environment.  Boston: Wisdom Publications, 2010.

 

Payutto, Prayudh. Buddhist Economics: A Middle Way for the Marketplace. Bangkok: Buddhadhamma Foundation, 1994.

 

Pei, Shengji. “Managing for Biological Diversity in Temple Yards and Holy Hills: The Traditional Practices of the Xishuangbanna Dai Community, Southwestern China.” In Ethics, Religion, and Biodiversity: Relations between Conservation and Cultural Values, eds. Lawrence S. Hamilton with Helen F. Takeuchi, 112–118. Cambridge: White Horse Press, 1993.

 

Perl, Jacob. “Ecology of Mind.” Primary Point 7, no. 2 (summer 1990): 4–6.

 

Phelps, Norm. The Great Compassion: Buddhism and Animal Rights. New York: Lantern Books, 2004.

 

Pitt, Martin. “The Pebble and the Tide.” In Dharma Gaia: A Harvest of Essays in Buddhism and Ecology, ed. Allan Hunt Badiner, 102–105. Berkeley, Calif.: Parallax Press, 1990.

 

Pongsak, Ajahn. “In the Water There Were Fish and the Fields Were Full of Rice: Reawakening the Lost Harmony of Thailand.” In Buddhism and Ecology, eds. Martine Batchelor and Kerry Brown, 87–99. London: Cassell, 1992.

 

Powers, C. John. Review of Buddhism and Ecology: The Interconnection of Dharma and Deeds, eds. Mary Evelyn Tucker and Duncan Williams. Environmental Ethics 22 (2000): 207-210.


Prasad, C. S. “Meat-eating and the Rule of Tikoṭipariśuddha.” In Studies in Pāli and Buddhism, edited by A. K. Narain, 289-95. Delhi: B. R. Publishing, 1979.

 

Prasad, H. Buddhist Aesthetics and Ethics.  New Delhi: MD Publications,

 

Puri, Bharati.  Engaged Buddhism: The Dalai Lama’s Worldview. New York: Oxford University Press, 2006.

 

Queen, Christopher S., ed. Engaged Buddhism in the West. Boston: Wisdom Publications, 2000.

 

Queen, Christopher, Charles Prebish, and Damien Keown, eds. Action Dharma: New Studies in Engaged Buddhism, New York: Routledge, 2003.


Queen, Christopher S. and Sallie B King, eds. Engaged Buddhism: Buddhist Liberation Movements in Asia. Albany: SUNY Press, 1996.    

 

Randhawa, M. S. The Cult of Trees and Tree Worship in Buddhist and Hindu Scripture. New Delhi: All-Indian Arts and Crafts Society, 1964.

 

Reed, Christopher. “Down to Earth.” In Dharma Gaia: A Harvest of Essays in Buddhism and Ecology, ed. Allan Hunt Badiner, 233–35. Berkeley, Calif.: Parallax Press, 1990.


Reugg, D. Seyfort.  “Ahimsa and Vegetarianism in the History of Buddhism,” in Rockefeller, Steven C. “Buddhism, Global Ethics, and the Earth Charter.” In Buddhism and Ecology: The Interconnection of Dharma and Deeds, edited by Mary Evelyn Tucker and Duncan Ryūken Williams, 313-24. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1997.

 

Rissho Kosei-kai. A Buddhist View for Inclusion in the Proposed “Earth Charter” Presented to the Preparatory Committee of the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED) (15 December 1991).

 

Roberts, Elizabeth, and Elias Amidon, eds. Earth Prayers. San Francisco, Calif.: Harper Collins, 1991.

 

_____. “Gaian Buddhism.” In Dharma Gaia: A Harvest of Essays in Buddhism and Ecology, ed. Allan Hunt Badiner, 147–54. Berkeley, Calif.: Parallax Press, 1990.

 

Roberts, Rosemary. What Would the Buddha Recycle: The Zen of Green Living. Avon, MA: F+W Media, 2009.

 

Robinson, Peter. “Some Thoughts on Buddhism and the Ethics of Ecology.” Proceedings of the New Mexico-West Texas Philosophical Society 7 (1972): 71–78.

 

Rockefeller, Steven C. “Buddhism, Global Ethics, and the Earth Charter.” In Buddhism and Ecology: The Interconnection of Dharma and Deeds, edited by Mary Evelyn Tucker and Duncan Ryūken Williams, 313-324. Cambridge MA: Harvard University Press, 1997.

 

Rolston, Holmes, III. “Respect for Life: Can Zen Buddhism Help in Forming an Environmental Ethic?” Zen Buddhism Today 7 (September 1989): 11–30.

 

_____. Environmental Ethics: Duties to and Values in the Natural World. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1988.

 

Roszak, Theodore, Gomes, Mary E., Kanner, Allen D., eds. Ecopsychology: Restoring the Earth, Healing the Mind. San Francisco: Sierra Club Books, 1995.

 

Rudloe, Anne. “Pine Forest Teachings: Bringing Joy and Compassion to the Environmental Wars.” Primary Point 7, no. 2 (summer 1990): 14–15.

 

Ruegg, D. Seyfort. “Ahimsa and Vegetarianism in the History of Buddhism.” In Buddhist Studies in Honour of Walpola Rahula, eds. Somaratna Balasooriya, et al., 234–41. London: Gordon Fraser, 1980; Sri Lanka: Vimamsa, 1980.

 

Ryan, P. D. Buddhism and the Natural World: Toward a Meaningful Myth. Birmingham, England: Windhorse Publications, 1998.

 

Sagaramati. “Do Buddhists Eat Meat?” Golden Drum: A Magazine for Western Buddhists (August-October 1989): 6–7.

 

Sahni, Pragati. Environmental Ethics in Buddhism: A Virtues Approach. New York: Routledge, 2008.

 

Sakya Trizin. A Buddhist View on Befriending and Defending Animals. Portland, Ore.: Orgyan Chogye Chonzo Ling, 1989.

 

Sandell, Klas, ed. Buddhist Perspectives on the Ecocrisis. Sri Lanka: Buddhist Publication Society, 1987.

 

_____. “Buddhist Philosophy as Inspiration to Ecodevelopment.” In Buddhist Perspectives on the Ecocrisis, ed. Klas Sandell, 30–37. Sri Lanka: Buddhist Publication Society, 1987.

 

Sasaki, Joshu. “Who Pollutes the World.” In Zero: Contemporary Buddhist Life and Thought, vol. 2, 151–57. Los Angeles, Calif.: Zero Press, 1979.

 

Schelling, Andrew. “Jataka Mind: Cross-Species Compassion from Ancient India to Earth First! Activists.” Tricycle 1, no. 1 (fall 1991): 10–19.

 

Schmidt, Hanns-Peter. “Ahimsa and Rebirth.” In Inside the Texts, Beyond the Texts: New Approaches to the Study of the Vedas, ed. Michael Witzel, 207–34. Harvard Oriental Series, Opera Minora, vol. 2. Cambridge, Mass.: Department of Sanskrit and Indian Studies, Harvard University, 1997.

 

Schmithausen, Lambert. “The Early Buddhist Tradition and Ecological Ethics.” In How Much is Enough?  Buddhism, Consumerism, and the Human Environment, edited by Richard K. Payne, 171-222.  Boston: Wisdom Publications, 2001.

 

_____. “The Early Buddhist Tradition and Environmental Ethics.” Journal of Buddhist Ethics 1 (1997): 1-74.

 

_____. Buddhism and Nature: The Lecture Delivered on the Occasion of the EXPO 1990 (An Enlarged Version with Notes). Tokyo: International Institute for Buddhist Studies, 1991.

 

_____. Plants as Sentient Beings in Earliest Buddhism: The A. L. Basham Lecture for 1989. Canberra, Australia: Faculty of Asian Studies, Australian National University, 1991.

 

_____. The Problem of the Sentience of Plants in Earliest Buddhism. Tokyo: International Institute for Buddhist Studies, 1991.

 

Schneider, David Tensho. “Saving the Earth’s Healing Resources.” Yoga Journal (July-August 1992): 57–63.

 

Schumacher, E. F. “Buddhist Economics.” In Valuing the Earth: Economics, Ecology, Ethics, eds. Herman E. Daly and Kenneth N. Townsend, 173–81. Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, 1993.

 

_____. Small is Beautiful: Economics as if People Mattered. New York: Harper & Row, 1973.

 

Sciberras, Colette.  “Buddhism and Speciesism: on the Misapplication of Western Concepts to Buddhist Beliefs.”  Journal of Buddhist Ethics 15 (2008): 215-40.

 

Seed, John. “The Rainforest as Teacher: An Interview with John Seed.” Inquiring Mind 8, no. 2 (spring 1992): 1, 6–7.

 

_____. “Wake the Dead!” In Dharma Gaia: A Harvest of Essays in Buddhism and Ecology, ed. Allan Hunt Badiner, 222–26. Berkeley, Calif.: Parallax Press, 1990.

 

_____. “Rainforest Man: An Interview by Stephen Bodian.” Yoga Journal (November-December 1989): 48–51, 106–108.

 

Seed, John, Joanna Macy, and Arne Naess, eds. Thinking Like a Mountain: Toward a Council of All Beings. Philadelphia, Pa.: New Society Publishers, 1988.

 

Seidel, Jackie, and David W. Jardine. Ecological Pedagogy, Buddhist Pedagogy, Hermeneutic Pedagogy: Experiments in a Curriculum for Miracles. New York: Peter Lang Publishing, 2014.

 

Selin, Helaine, ed. Nature Across Cultures: Views of Nature and the Environment in Non-Western Cultures. The Hague and London: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 2003.

 

Sendzimir, Jan. “Satellite Eyes and Chemical Noses.” Primary Point 7, no. 2 (summer 1990): 15, 16, 18.

 

Seung Sahn. “Not Just a Human World.” Primary Point 7, no. 2 (summer 1990): 3–4.

 

Shabkar. Food of Bodhisattvas: Buddhist Teachings on Abstaining from Meat. Shambhala, 2004.

 

Shaner, David Edward. “The Japanese Experience of Nature.” In Nature in Asian Traditions of Thought: Essays in Environmental Philosophy, eds. J. Baird Callicott and Roger T. Ames, 163–82. Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1989.

 

Shaner, David Edward, and R. Shannon Duval. “Conservation Ethics and the Japanese Intellectual Tradition.” Conservation Ethics 11 (fall 1989): 197–214.

 

Shaw, Miranda. “Nature in Dogen’s Philosophy and Poetry.” Journal of the International Association of Buddhist Studies 8, no. 2 (1985): 111–32.

 

Shepard, Philip T. “Turning On to the Environment without Turning Off Other People.” Buddhism at the Crossroads 6, no. 4 (fall 1990): 18–21.


Shepherd, Robert J. Faith in Heritage: Displacement, Development, and Religious Tourism in Contemporary China. London & New York: Routledge, 2013.

 

Shimizu, Yoshiaki. “Multiple Commemorations: The Vegetable Nehan of Ito Jakuchu.” In Flowing Traces: Buddhism in the Literary and Visual Arts of Japan, ed. James H. Sanford, et al., 201–33. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1992.

 

Shively, Donald H. “Buddhahood for the Nonsentient: A Theme in No Plays.” Harvard Journal of Asiatic Studies 20, nos. 1–2 (June 1957): 135–61.

 

Sivaraksa, Sulak. “How Societies Can Practice the Precepts.” In For a Future to Be Possible: Commentaries on the Five Wonderful Precepts, ed. Thich Nhat Hanh, 110–14. Berkeley, Calif.: Parallax Press, 1993.

 

_____. Seeds of Peace: A Buddhist Vision for Renewing Society. Ed. Tom Ginsburg. Berkeley, Calif.: Parallax Press, 1992.

 

_____. “A Buddhist Perception of a Desirable Society.” In Ethics of Environment and Development: Global Challenge, International Response, eds. J. Ronald Engel and Joan Gibb Engel, 213–21. Tucson, Ariz.: University of Arizona Press, 1990.

 

_____. “True Development.” In Dharma Gaia: A Harvest of Essays in Buddhism and Ecology, ed. Allan Hunt Badiner, 169–77. Berkeley, Calif.: Parallax Press, 1990.

 

_____. “Building Trust through Economic and Social Development and Ecological Balance: A Buddhist Perspective.” In Radical Conservatism: Buddhism in the Contemporary World: Articles in Honour of Bhikkhu Buddhadasa’s 84th Birthday Anniversary, 179–98. Bangkok: Thai Inter-Religious Commission for Development/International Network of Engaged Buddhists, 1990.

 

_____. A Socially Engaged Buddhism. Bangkok: Thai Inter-Religious Commission for Development, 1988.

 

_____. “Rural Poverty and Development in Thailand, Indonesia, and the Philippines.” Ecologist 15, nos. 5–6 (1985): 266–68.

 

_____. Siamese Resurgence: A Thai Buddhist Voice on Asia and a World of Change. Bangkok: Asian Cultural Forum on Development, 1985.

 

Sivaraksa, Sulak, Pipob Udomittipong, and Chris Walker, eds. Socially Engaged Buddhism for the New Millennium: Essays in Honor of the Ven. Phra Dhammapitaka (Bhikkhu P.A. Payutto) on his 60th Birthday Anniversary. Bangkok: Sathirakoses-Nagapradipa Foundation & Foundation for Children, 1999.

 

Skolimowski, Henryk. A Sacred Place to Dwell: Living with Reverence upon the Earth. Rockport, Mass.: Element, 1993.

 

_____. “Eco-Philosophy and Buddhism: A Personal Journey.” Buddhism at the Crossroads 6, no. 4 (fall 1990): 26–29.

 

_____. Eco-Philosophy: Designing New Tactics for Living. Salem, N.H.: Marion Boyars, 1981.

 

Smith, Joanna Handlin. “Liberating Animals in Ming-Qing China: Buddhist Inspiration and Elite Imagination.” Journal of Asian Studies 58, no.1 (1999): 51-84.

 

Snyder, Gary. The Great Clod: Notes and Memoirs on Nature and History in East Asia. Berkeley: Counterpoint, 2016.


_____. “Nets of Beads, Webs of Cells.” Mountain Record 14, no. 3 (spring 1996): 50–54.

 

_____. “Exhortations for Baby Tigers: The End of the Cold War and the End of Nature.” Shambhala Sun 4, no. 2 (November 1995): 31–33. Reprinted in A Place in Space: Ethics, Aesthetics, and Watersheds: New and Selected Prose (Washington, D.C.: Counterpoint, 1995).

 

_____. A Place in Space: Ethics, Aesthetics, and Watersheds: New and Selected Prose Washington, D.C.: Counterpoint, 1995.

 

_____. “Walking the Great Ridge Omine on the Diamond-Womb Trail.” In The Sacred Mountains of Asia, ed. John Einarsen, 71–77. Boston: Shambhala Press, 1995.

 

_____. “A Village Council of All Beings: Ecology, Place, and Awakening of Compassion.” Turning Wheel (spring 1994): 12–15.

 

_____. “Indra’s Net as Our Own.” In For a Future to Be Possible: Commentaries on the Five Wonderful Precepts, ed. Thich Nhat Hanh, 127–35. Berkeley, Calif.: Parallax Press, 1993.

 

_____. No Nature: New and Selected Poems. New York: Pantheon, 1992.

 

_____. The Practice of the Wild: Essays. San Francisco, Calif.: North Point Press, 1990.

 

_____. “The Etiquette of Freedom.” Sierra 74, no. 5 (September-October 1989): 74–77, 113–16.

 

_____. “Buddhism and the Possibilities of a Planetary Culture.” In Deep Ecology: Living As If Nature Mattered, eds. Bill Devall and George Sessions, 251–53. Salt Lake City, Utah: Peregrine Smith Books, 1985. Reprinted in The Path of Compassion: Writings on Socially Engaged Buddhism, ed. Fred Eppsteiner, 82–85 (Berkeley, Calif.: Parallax Press, 1988).

 

_____. The Real Work: Interviews and Talks, 1964–1979. New York: New Directions, 1980.

 

_____. Riprap and Cold Mountain Poems. San Francisco, Calif.: Four Seasons Foundation, 1976.

 

_____. Six Sections from Mountains and Rivers without End. San Francisco, Calif.: Four Seasons Foundation, 1976.

 

_____. Turtle Island. New York: New Directions Books, 1974.

 

_____. Earth House Hold: Technical Notes and Queries to Fellow Dharma Revolutionaries. New York: New Directions Books, 1957.

 

Sotoshu Shumucho. International Symposium: The Future of the Earth and Zen Buddhism. Tokyo: Sotoshu Shumucho, 1991.

 

Sponberg, Alan. “The Buddhist Conception of an Ecological Self.” Western Buddhist Review 2. August 1997. http://www.westernbuddhistreview.com/vol2/ecological_self.html

 

_____. “Green Buddhism and the Hierarchy of Compassion.” Western Buddhist Review 1 (December 1994): 131–55.

 

_____. Review of Dharma Gaia: A Harvest of Essays in Buddhism and Ecology, ed. Allan Hunt Badiner. Environmental Ethics 14, no. 3 (fall 1992): 279–82.

 

Sponsel, Leslie E. “Cultural Ecology and Environmental Education.” Journal of Environmental Education 19, no. 1 (1987): 31–42.

 

_____. Spiritual Ecology: A Quiet Revolution. Santa Barbara, CA: Praeger, 2012.

 

Sponsel, Leslie E., and Poranee Natadecha-Sponsel. “Illuminating Darkness: The Monk-Cave-Bat-Ecosystem Complex in Thailand.” In Socially Engaged Spirituality: Essays in Honor of Sulak Sivaraksa on His 70th Birthday, ed. David W. Chappell, 255-270. Bangkok: Sathirakoses-Nagapradipa Foundation, 2003. Reprinted in This Sacred Earth: Religion, Nature, Environment, ed. Roger S. Gottlieb, 134-144. New York: Routledge, 2004. (http://www.anthropology.hawaii.edu/resources/projects/thailand/cave.htm)

 

_____. “Buddhist Views of Nature and the Environment.” In Nature Across Cultures: Views of Nature and the Environment in Non-Western Cultures, ed. Helaine Selin, 351-371. Boston: Kluwer Academic Press, 2003.

 

_____. “Why a Tree is More than a Tree: Reflections on the Spiritual Ecology of Sacred Trees in Thailand.” Santi Pracha Dhamma, eds. Pipob Udomittipong, et al., 364-373. Bangkok: Santi Pracha Dhamma Institute, Sathirakoses-Nagapradipa Foundation, and Foundation for Children, 2001.

 

_____. “A Theoretical Analysis of the Potential Contribution of the Monastic Community in Promoting a Green Society in Thailand.” In Buddhism and Ecology: The Interconnectedness of Dharma and Deeds, edited by Mary Evelyn Tucker and Duncan Ryuken Williams, 45-68. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1997.

 

_____. “The Role of Buddhism for Creating a More Sustainable Society in Thailand.” In Counting the Costs: Economic Growth and Environmental Change in Thailand, ed. Jonathan Rigg, 27–46. Singapore: Institute of Southeast Asian Studies, 1995.

 

_____. The Role of Buddhism in Creating a More Sustainable Society in Thailand. London: School of Oriental and African Studies, 1994.

 

_____. “The Relevance of Buddhism for the Development of an Environmental Ethic for the Conservation of Biodiversity.” In Ethics, Religion, and Biodiversity: Relations between Conservation and Cultural Values, eds. Lawrence S. Hamilton with Helen

F. Takeuchi, 75–97. Cambridge: White Horse Press, 1993.

 

_____. “Nonviolent Ecology: The Possibilities of Buddhism.” In Buddhism and Nonviolent Global Problem-Solving: Ulan Bator Explorations, eds. Glenn D. Paige and Sarah Gilliatt, 139–50. Honolulu, Hawaii: Center for Global Nonviolence Planning Project, Spark M. Matsunaga Institute for Peace, University of Hawaii, 1991.

 

_____. “Buddhism, Ecology, and Forests in Thailand: Past, Present, and Future.” In Changing Tropical Forests: Historical Perspectives on Today’s Challenges in Asia, Australasia, and Oceania: Workshop Meeting, Canberra, 16–18 May 1988, ed. John Dargavel, et al., 305–25. Canberra: Australian National University Centre for Resource and Environmental Studies, 1988.

 

Spretnak, Charlene. States of Grace: The Recovery of Meaning in the Postmodern Age. San Francisco, Calif.: Harper San Francisco, 1991.

 

_____. “Dhamma at the Precinct Level.” In The Path of Compassion: Writings on Socially Engaged Buddhism, ed. Fred Eppsteiner, 199–202. Berkeley, Calif.: Parallax Press, 1988.

 

_____. “Green Politics and Beyond.” In Turning the Wheel: American Women Creating the New Buddhism, ed. Sandy Boucher, 284–88. San Francisco, Calif.: Harper and Row, 1988.

 

Spretnak, Charlene, and Fritjof Capra. Green Politics. Santa Fe, N. Mex.: Bear and Co., 1986.

 

Stanley, John, David R. Loy, and Gyurme Dorje, eds. A Buddhist Response to the Climate Emergency. Somerville: Wisdom Publications, 2009.

 

Steele, Kristin and Stephanie Kaza. “Buddhist Food Practices and Attitudes Among Contemporary Western Practitioners.” Ecotheology 9 (2000): 49-67. (http://www.uvm.edu/~skaza/publications/assets/ecotheology.PDF)

 

Stone, David. “How Shall We Live? Deep Ecology Week at the Naropa Institute.” Vajradhatu Sun, August-September 1990, 13–14.

 

Story, Francis. The Place of Animals in Buddhism. Kandy, Sri Lanka: Bodhi Leaves, Buddhist Publication Society, 1964.

 

Strain, Charles. “Engaged Buddhist Praxis and Ecological Ethics.” Worldviews 20 (2016): 189-210.

 

_____. “Reinventing Buddhist Practices to Meet the Challenge of Climate Change.” Contemporary Buddhism (2016): 1-19.

 

Suzuki, Daisetz. Zen and Japanese Culture. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1973.

 

Swearer, Donald K. “An Assessment of Buddhist Eco-Philosophy.” Harvard Theological Review 99, no. 2 (2006), 123-37.

 

_____. “The Hermeneutics of Buddhist Ecology in Contemporary Thailand: Buddhadāsa and Dhammapiṭaka.” In Buddhism and Ecology: The Interconnection of Dharma and Deeds, edited by Mary Evelyn Tucker and Duncan Ryūken Williams, 21-44. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1997; republished in Worldviews, Religion, and the Environment: A Global Anthology, edited by Richard G. Foltz, 181-193. Belmont, CA: Thomson Wadsworth, 2003.

 

_____. “Sulak Sivaraksa: Engaged Buddhist Activist and Environmentalist.” In Socially Engaged Spirituality: Essays in Honor of Sulak Sivaraksa on His 70th Birthday, ed. David W. Chappell, 645-648. Bangkok: The Sathirakoses-Nagapradipa Foundation, 2003.

 

_____. “Principles and Poetry, Places and Stories: The Resources of Buddhist Ecology.” Daedalus 130, no. 4 (2001): 225­-41. http://www.amacad.org/publications/fall2001/swearer.aspx

 

Swearer, Donald K., Sommai Premchit, and Phaithoon Dokbuakaew. Sacred Mountains of Northern Thailand: And Their Legends. Chiang Mai, Thailand: Silkworm Books, 2004. 

 

Sylvan, Richard "A Critique of Deep Ecology, Part I." Radical Philosophy 40 (1984): 2-12; Part II, Radical Philosophy 41 (1985): 10-22.

 

Tam, Angela. “Saving Indra’s Net: Buddhist Tools for Tackling Climate Change and Social Inequity.” Human Architecture: Journal of the Sociology of Self-Knowledge 6, no. 3 (2008): 129-132.

 

Tan, Joan Qionglin. Han Shan, Chan Buddhism and Gary Snyder's Ecopoetic Way. Brighton: Sussex Academic Press, 2009.

 

Tanahashi, Kazuaki. “Garbage First.” Turning Wheel (winter 1994): 39.

 

Taylor, J. L. Forest Monks and the Nation-State: An Anthropological and Historical Study in Northeastern Thailand. Singapore: Institute of Southeast Asian Studies, 1993.

 

_____. “Social Activism and Resistance on the Thai Frontier: The Case of Phra Parajak Khuttajitto.” Bulletin of Concerned Asian Scholars 25, no. 2 (1993): 3–16.

 

Thanissara. Time to Stand Up: An Engaged Buddhist Manifesto for Our Earth — The Buddha's Life and Message through Feminine Eyes. Berkeley: North Atlantic Books, 2015.

 

Thompson, James Soshin. “Radical Confidence: What is Missing from Eco-Activism.” Tricycle 3, no. 2 (winter 1993): 40–45.

 

_____. “Returning to the Source: Radical Confidence for Environmentalists.” Ten Directions (spring-summer 1993): 31–33.

 

_____. “The Mind of Interbeing.” Ten Directions (spring-summer 1990): 16–17.

Thurman, Robert. “Buddhist Views of Nature: Variations on the Theme of Mother-Father Harmony.” In On Nature, ed. Leroy S. Rouner, 96–112. Notre Dame, Ind.: University of Notre Dame Press, 1984.

 

Thurman, Robert A.F. “Buddhist Views of Nature: Variations on the Theme of Mother-Farther Harmony. In On Nature, edited by Leroy S. Rouner, 96-112. Notre Dame, Ind.: University of Notre Dame Press, 1984.

 

Timmerman, Peter. “It Is Dark Outside: Western Buddhism from the Enlightenment to the Global Crisis.” In Buddhism and Ecology, eds. Martine Batchelor and Kerry Brown, 65–77. London: Cassell, 1992.

 

Titmuss, Christopher. “Western Buddhism and the Global Crisis.” In Dharma Rain: Sources of Buddhist Environmentalism, edited by Stephanie Kaza and Krnneth Kraft, 357-68. Boston: Shambhala Publications, 2000.

 

_____. The Green Buddha. Devon, United Kingdom: Insights, 1995.

 

_____. “On the Green Credo.” Tricycle 3, no. 2 (winter 1993): 55–57.

 

_____. “Interactivity.” In The Path of Compassion: Writings on Socially Engaged Buddhism, ed. Fred Eppsteiner, 182–89. Berkeley, Calif.: Parallax Press, 1988.

 

Tou-hui, Fok. “Where Is the Green Movement Going.” The Light of Dharma 81 (February 1989).

 

Treace, Bonnie Myotai. “Home: Born As the Earth Training.” Mountain Record (winter 1991): 36–41.

 

Tucker, Mary Evelyn. Worldly Wonder: Religions Enter Their Ecological Phase. Chicago, IL: Open Court, 2003.

 

Tucker, Mary Evelyn, and Duncan Ryuken Williams, eds. Buddhism and Ecology: The Interconnectedness of Dharma and Deeds. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard Divinity School Center for the Study of World Religions, 1997. Distributed by Harvard University Press.

 

Tucker, Mary Evelyn, and John A. Grim, eds. Worldviews and Ecology: Religion, Philosophy, and the Environment. Maryknoll, N.Y.: Orbis, 1994.

 

Udomittipong, Pibob. “Thailand's Ecology Monks.” In Dharma Rain: Sources of Buddhist Environmentalism, edited by Stephanie Kaza and Kenneth Kraft, 191-97.   Boston: Shambhala, 2000.

 

Valder, Peter. Gardens In China. Portland, OR: Timber Press, 2002.

 

Venturini, Riccardo. “A Buddhist View on Ecological Balance.” Dharma World 17 (March-April 1990): 19–23.

 

Visalo, Phra Phaisan. “The Forest Monastery and Its Relevance to Modern Thai Society.” In Radical Conservatism: Buddhism in the Contemporary World: Articles in Honour of Bhikkhu Buddhadasa’s 84th Birthday Anniversary, 288–300. Bangkok: Thai Inter-Religious Commission for Development/International Network of Engaged Buddhists, 1990.

 

Waldau, Paul. The Specter of Speciesism: Buddhist and Christian Views of Animals. New York: Oxford University Press, 2002.

 

_____. “Buddhism and Animal Rights.” Contemporary Buddhist Ethics, ed. Damien Keown, 81-113. London: Curzon Press, 2000.

 

_____. “A Review of Buddhism and Ecology: The Interconnection of Dharma and Deeds; Buddhism and Ecology: Balancing Convergence, Dissonance, and the Risk of Anachronism.” Journal of Buddhist Ethics 5 (1998): 374-83.

 

Wallace, Alan B., ed. Buddhism and Science: Breaking New Ground. New York: Columbia University Press, 2003.

 

Wallis, Nick. “Buddhism and the Environment.” Golden Drum: A Magazine for Western Buddhists, August-October 1989, 4–5.

 

Walters, Kerry S. and Lisa Portmess, eds. Religious Vegetarianism: From Hesiod to the Dalai Lama. Albany: State University of New York Press, 2001.

 

Wasi, Prawase. “Alternative Buddhist Agriculture.” In Radical Conservatism: Buddhism in the Contemporary World: Articles in Honour of Bhikkhu Buddhadasa’s 84th Birthday Anniversary, 172–78. Bangkok: Thai Inter-Religious Commission for Development/International Network of Engaged Buddhists, 1990.

 

Waskow, Arthur. “What Is Eco-Kosher.” In For a Future to Be Possible: Commentaries on the Five Wonderful Precepts, ed. Thich Nhat Hanh, 115–21. Berkeley, Calif.: Parallax Press, 1993.

 

Watanabe, Manabu. “Religious Symbolism in Saigyo’s Verses: Contribution to Discussions of His Views on Nature and Religion.” History of Religions 26, no. 4 (May 1987): 382–400.

 

Weber, Thomas. “Gandhi, Deep Ecology, Peace Research and Buddhist Economics.” Journal of Peace Research 36, no. 3 (1999): 349-361.

 

Wei Dedong. “The Ecological Perspective of Buddhism.” In The Progress of Environmental Ethics: Critics and Interpretation, ed. Xu Songling. Social Science Literature Press, 1999.

 

Weizsäcker, Ernst Ulrich von, and Daisaku Ikeda. Knowing Our Worth: Conversations on Energy and Sustainability. Cambridge, MA: Dialogue Path Press, 2016.

 

White, David M., and Susan M. Guyette. Zen Birding. Hants, UK: O-Books, 2010.

 

White, Lynn. "The Historical Roots of Our Ecologic Crisis. Science 155/3767 (10 March 1967): 1203-7.

 

Williams, Duncan. “Buddhist Environmentalism in Contemporary Japan.”  In How Much Is Enough? Buddhism, Consumerism, and the Human Environment, edited by Richard K. Payne, 17-37. Boston: Wisdom Publications, 2010.

 

_____. “The Interface of Buddhism and Environmentalism in North America.” B.A. thesis, Reed College, 1991.

 

Wirth, Jason M. Mountains, Rivers, and the Great Earth: Reading Gary Snyder and Dogen in an

Age of Ecological Crisis. Albany: SUNY Press, 2017.

 

Wise, Nina. “Full, As in Good.” Turning Wheel (spring 1994): 26–27.

 

_____. “Rock Body Tree Limb.” In Dharma Gaia: A Harvest of Essays in Buddhism and Ecology, ed. Allan Hunt Badiner, 99–101. Berkeley, Calif.: Parallax Press, 1990.

 

World Wildlife Fund International. The Assisi Declarations: Messages on Man and Nature from Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Islam, and Judaism. Geneva: World Wildlife Fund International, 1986.

 

Yamaoka, Seigen H. A Buddhist View of the Environment. San Francisco, Calif.: Buddhist Churches of America, 1991.

 

Yamauchi, Jeffrey Scott. “The Greening of American Zen: An Historical Overview and a Specific Application.” Master’s thesis, Prescott College, 1996.

 

Yanase Giryo. O Buddha! A Desperate Cry from a Dying World, translated by Mark Caprio and Naito Yukiko. Nagoya, Japan: KWIX, 1986.

 

Yokoyama, W. S. “Circling the Mountain: Observations on the Japanese Way of Life.” In Buddhism and Ecology, ed. Martine Batchelor and Kerry Brown, 55–64. London: Cassell, 1992.

 

Yü, Dan Smyer. Mindscaping the Landscape of Tibet: Place, Memorability, Ecoaesthetics. Berlin: De Gruyter, 2015.

 

Yü, Dan Smyer and Jean Michaud, eds. Trans-Himalayan Borderlands: Livelihoods, Territorialities, Modernities. Amsterdam University Press, 2017.

Zsolnai, Laszlo, and Ims, Knut Johannessen, eds. Buddhism within Limits: Deep Ecology and Buddhist Economics. Oxford: Peter Lang, 2006.